Beginners: The Hockey Noob Chronicles II (Beginners' Thread)

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by Jarick, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. WarriorOfGandhi Was saying Boo-urns

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    also, you'll learn a lot from guys just giving advice at drop-in. I've gone to at least a dozen drop-ins where some guy sitting next to me on the bench told me something that changed how I play
     
  2. terranraida #RyanGetzlafIsASaint

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    Sorry for the late reply, but I agree with this. Last time I was at a pick up game the local beer league season was about to start, and the guy next to me told me i was using the wrong sided stick - I write left handed and so I thought I would play left handed, boy was I wrong. He was super helpful and even swapped sticks with me for the game to get a feel for how it worked.

    Super helpful.
     
  3. 542365 2018-19 Cup Champs!

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    I'm not really a beginner so to speak, but I don't want to start a new thread for it. I'm looking for advice on how to shoot with accuracy cutting from right to left as a right handed shooter. I can usually get it to my forehand, but then I unleash a muffin that rarely hits my spot. Any technique/advice? Thanks in advance.
     
  4. TCDaniels Legen... Wait for it

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    Are you talking about shooting in closer to the goalie, or back out towards the point?

    If you're talking about cutting across the lower slot from right to left, and getting a shot off - my number one piece of advice would be: Learn how to shoot an effective backhand.

    Guys who can do that score a ****-ton of goals in close.
     
  5. seafoam HFBoards Sponsor Sponsor

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    Just picked up some used skates today, and am going to start looking for somewhere to take lessons.

    I don't have much experience skating in the past, so what are my odds of eventually playing in a pick up league? I was a college athlete in a different sport to give you an idea of my athleticism.

    Does is come down to learning how to skate from someone who knows what they are talking about?
     
  6. 542365 2018-19 Cup Champs!

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    You should be able to play pick up without much issue. Pick up is much slower paced and not nearly as intense as league play. I've also found that people take it easy on you a bit in pick up if it's obvious you're just learning to play. I've had very few problems with pick up, just a bunch of guys that want to get out and skate.

    If you take lessons and feel somewhat confident stopping and turning(basically a good enough skater so you aren't going to kill yourself or anyone else out there) you should be fine to give some low level pick up a shot. I would practice stick handling passing and shooting as much as possible at home so you can have a chance to score whenever you're given the opportunity.

    One thing I've noticed with new players is that the have a tendency to sit back and just try to play defense because they think they're actually helping(I tried to phrase that without sounding like a dick but it didn't work) when in reality it's extremely easy for experienced players to take advantage of a new player playing defense, so it would be best to let more experienced players stay back. Playing forward also forces you to use all of your skills and you'll get better much faster even if your goal in the future is to play defense.

    Tl;dr Learn to skate at even a basic level and you should be fine. People understand what it's like learning to play.
     
  7. seafoam HFBoards Sponsor Sponsor

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    Thanks for the advice! I know my area has a pretty large league with various difficulties D all the way to Pro-Am. You think one day I could play something decently competitive?
     
  8. PlayoffBeard365 Registered User

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    Great and true advice from MattyMo35!


    Just a for instance. Me: 39 years old. Skating 16 months. Playing pick up 14 months. Now playing on D level Team (south of Boston). Never skated or held an ice hockey stick previous to 16 months ago. Taking weekly private lessons. Never played a high school or college level sport. Only workout, mtn bike, surf, snowboard. Im in decent but not great shape and currently a mid of road player in D league. But, trending up :).

    Without private skating lessons and playing pickup 3 nights per week for over a year I would not be able to compete in D league. That being said I have seen guys play in my D league who can't skate very well at all and some who have obviously been skating most of their lives. D league tends to have a surplus of newbs and guys slumming down a level.

    Depending on your age, fitness, level of commitment and league play you may get to C level. Most guys at that level in my area have played hockey since age 5 or so, played high school and maybe Jr's too. So obviously you would be a bit behind :). But the mind is a powerful thing and Im certainly not going to say no. At 39 and still a newb I do have high aspirations/expectations but I am concentrating now on being the best D level player I can. It requires much faster reaction and has much greater level of defense than does pick up as already mentioned. Game play is also much different with penalties, face-offs, refs, egos, intense defense, faster shifts (hopefully), etc.

    Speaking of the mind, when the play is faster (D league or playing pick up with Jr players on my line) my decisions are much better as i don't overthink, but my stick handling, shooting and skating still needs to elevate.

    While all skills are important. Skating and game awareness is what i see that most differentiates player levels. DEF TAKE LESSONS! GOOD LUCK!!!
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2015
  9. 542365 2018-19 Cup Champs!

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    No question. You're young enough and athletic that you'll make significant progress very quickly if you stay dedicated to it. The lessons should help quite a bit. Maybe go to a public skate once or twice a week, play pick up as much as possible, and work on your skills at home and you'll make quick progress.

    Another thing I notice with new players at pick up that I think is a mistake is that they often just defer to the better players in pick up. The score doesn't matter, take some chances. Try stickhandling around a guy or two every once in a while(don't hog the puck, but don't be afraid to try to make a play). You won't get any better simply watching guys play. You will probably make a lot of mistakes, and people will almost certainly chirp you about it, but just laugh it off and HAVE FUN.
     
  10. seafoam HFBoards Sponsor Sponsor

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    You're an inspiration man, thanks for everything! :yo:

    Same to you MattyMo, appreciate the advice. It doesn't sound like something that is out of reach. :)
     
  11. shorkie88 Registered User

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    hi guys, looking for a little advice and don't think it warrants a new thread.

    when you are skating the puck in and are forced to the outside, what should you be doing if theres no pass or shot available?

    thanks!
     
  12. WaltWhitman Registered User

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    IF you're sure you can't make a move inside or go around or shoot for a rebound:
    THEN, get the puck deep in the corner/behind-the-net by skating it or shooting it. wait for reinforcements and start cycling/forechecking.
     
  13. backcheck7 Registered User

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    Plus it feels extra sweet when you finally get past a guy who's definitely better than you.

    This too. When I was first starting literally anybody that took the time to give me even a 2 second tip on anything was instantly my favourite person that day. It's super intimidating getting started and I know for myself I was super self-conscious about messing up. So when someone leagues better than me would say "hey man, next time you want to do this instead" it was highly encouraging, the key was the "next time" because it wasn't "get lost you suck" it was "when you get back out there, try this instead."
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2015
  14. McCauleyChirps Gare's "Partner"

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    I'm a fan of pulling up and waiting for a trailer. If the trailer is covered, hopefully he'll still go to the net and then I'll shoot hoping for a rebound.
     
  15. tooncesmeow Registered User

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    Hey guys, I'm a relative(?) new player. I've been watching hockey for the last 6 years pretty intensely, and I love the game. I started as a 5 year old but at 13 I had to give it up when we moved from Toronto to Florida. After a pretty long drought of skating and playing I've finally moved near an ice rink and have time to actually attend it.

    What I'm wondering is, is there any guides I can read up on for skating form and shooting form and just playing all positions until I'm comfortable? Essentially I'm just going to spend 2 or 3 days a week at their free skates and get comfortable on skates again and then start attending pick up games. I don't really have a big budget for equipment or lessons so essentially what would be considered enough of a routine to get me playing Beer League when I move back to Canada in December?

    Also as someone with one pair of glasses, should I swap 'em out for some contacts or go without? My vision is ***** without them on.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2015
  16. mashedpotato full stack.

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    I'm new too and have had trouble with this for a while...I can tell you that there's no real correct answer because of game dynamics.

    I can tell you that you've got several options starting with dumping puck in deep, pulling up and waiting for help; but the origins of your dilemma starts with keeping your head up, working with your stick handling and skating...

    ... once you've figured out how to move the puck around (product of stick handling and skating) and avoiding being driven wide by opposing defense (product of keeping your head up), you'll essentially avoid this issue.

    I will tell you that it takes time and practice and a level of comfort with the puck so stay positive and continue to work on the fundamentals.
     
  17. McCauleyChirps Gare's "Partner"

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    So, you want to know about the physics of a slap shot? Awesome slo mo stuff, including a stick break towards the end. A little cheesy, but good info. Found this on youtube:

     
  18. KyleJRM Registered User

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    Can't believe I get to join this thread. Blah blah blah, 33, loved watching hockey since I was 9, raised and lived in rural cornfields without a lot of ice around, now living in Orange County, California and decided to just go for it.

    First time on ice ever was two weeks ago for the first week of Adult Hockey Skating lessons. Teacher showed us one-foot snowplows, said we'd be working on them for several classes. No class last week for Thanksgiving, but I've managed to get about 4 hours of practice time in since then and watched a lot of Youtube videos of the techniques I'm supposed to be following. Can't wait to show up to class tomorrow night able to reliably stop with a one-foot snowplow on either foot.

    Plan is to finish this class, take the follow-up (adult hockey skills) in Jan/Feb and be ready to play in the spring beginner league that starts in March.
     
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  19. Fremitus Borealis Flügelstürmer

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    Good on you, man. The most important thing when you're starting out (which you're already doing) is learning to skate properly. Everything else can develop as you go, but if you can't skate it will obviously hold you back. The main reason for this is that skating is probably the "least natural" thing about hockey, if that makes any sense. In my opinion, most of the other skills have carry over from other sports, or everyday life, but skating is just kind of its own thing, and really takes a "leap of faith" for your body to finally trust itself to do it.
     
  20. jlt73 Registered User

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    Noob Here!

    I'm 32, and decided to go all in and begin playing. In high school I was a 3 sport athlete (football, wrestling and baseball) and weighed 210 (I'm 5'7). After high school, I stopped being so active and shot up to 320 ish pounds as well as had back surgery (microdiscectomy). I figured what a better way to get in control of my life again than to follow a dream of playing ice hockey! Its also nice to have a wife that is super supportive of me trying this sport.

    Today was my third official time on the ice and I feel that I am improving nicely. I can turn pretty well and stop on one side really well. I haven't tried backwards skating yet or crossovers or transitions. Today was also my first stick and puck session and a couple of dudes there were really helpful and included me on some of the stuff they were working on, it was also nice that there was only 3 of us there for most of the time and then I had the ice to myself for a good half hour. I am trying to get as much ice time as possible.

    I also begin an instructional league in February. I am super excited to play! I just finished getting all of the gear I will need. February couldn't come any sooner.
     
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  21. PlayoffBeard365 Registered User

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    Right on! Keep it up man.
     
  22. Aurilius Registered User

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    I just want to say I'm really glad I found this forum. Turning 32 soon and have been obsessed with hockey for years, but never got a chance to play growing up poor in rural PA.

    I have never considered the option of adult hockey until recently, and reading here is really getting me amped up. I played soccer in high school and college, indoor and outdoor, but my frame always made me feel clumsy. I roller skated alot growing up, then roller bladed. I can skate backwards as comfortably as forwards on wood, Jump 180's and 360's on rollers, though it's been half a decade. But ice I am not comfortable on yet. But I have decided to try. My boys just starting to learn walking and I figure it's about time I start skating.

    Any recommendations on getting started would be awesome. I'm still in rural PA, almost dead center between Elmira and Binghampton NY. My brief research tells me there's drop in and adult leagues in Elmira so I'm going to check out that lead today.
    First step, but some skates.
     
  23. Goonzilla Welcome to my house!

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    Buy skates..go skating..learn to stop.

    Inline players I've seen converting usually can skate a bit or don't have to many problems getting around; and usually dangle and handle, but they don't stop too well.
     
  24. Fremitus Borealis Flügelstürmer

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    This was definitely my problem initially. I was a pretty decent inline player like 15 years ago, but even though I had hockey skates and went skating during the winter, I never got ultra proficient at stopping until I joined a men's ice hockey league. It seems silly in the abstract, but it really is integral to everything you do on the ice. I think half the reason some guys on my team just sort of float around the ice isn't that they're naturally slow or anything... it's that they're afraid to fall on their ass when they stop.

    Anyway, good on you for wanting to start, Aurilius. You're really never too old (I'm your age, and picked it back up this past year), and you'll find most players are pretty supportive of n00bs. Just get some skates, find some ice, and start skating. Watch a bunch of YouTube videos on the mechanics of skating/stopping so you at least have an idea of how it works, and have at it. If there are any "learn to play hockey" leagues/teams in a city near you, I can't recommend it highly enough! The structured format really keeps you honest, as long as you're dedicated to getting better.

    Oh, one other thing! It may or may not be too late at this point, but I'll throw it out there: keep in mind that the way you hold a baseball bat and the way you hold a hockey stick (in terms of which hand is on the top/bottom) DO NOT necessarily have to be the same thing. Most Americans seem to default to having their left hand on the butt-end of the stick, when in reality your right may be your stronger hand (and you'll be holding the stick with JUST that hand a lot). Something to think about if you're starting from absolute ground level. I shoot "right", but really wish I could go back and start off shooting "left" sometimes, even though I write right handed. If that makes sense.
     
  25. Aurilius Registered User

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    Thanks for the tips. I hit the ice for the first time earlier today, and stopping is definitely my biggest issue. Gonna work on that tomorrow. The guys at the shop I got my skates and shins at suggested I try lefty first being right handed and it's comfortable. Actually I was surprised, I thought skating with the puck would be the hardest part but I found that to be the easiest. the puck gave me something else to focus on other than what my feet are doing and just let muscle memory take care of the skating.
     

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