Who did Joey Mullen pass to set the record?

Discussion in 'The History of Hockey' started by tmg, Mar 20, 2007.

  1. tmg

    tmg Registered User

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    I've been poring through statistics and google trying to figure it out, but I can't.

    As we all know, Mike Modano passed Joey Mullen last weekend to become the all-time highest-goal-scoring US-born NHL player. What I've been trying to figure out is, who did Mullen pass to achieve that distinction (and when)? Of the 'other 9' of the top 10 US-born goalscorers in NHL history, most of them 90's players, none of them were ever *ahead* of Mullen at any point in time (until Modano). #11 Dave Christian was at some point ahead of Mullen, but when Mullen passed Christian while both were still active in '86-'87 at that time they were only around 200 goals, which I believe some earlier US-born players had already achieved. So Mullen didn't set the record when he passed Christian. So... who did he pass to set the record that didn't fall until this past Saturday?

    And, does anyone know, was there any sort of ceremony or acknowledgement (either on the night of it happening, or a later game?)

    A related note - was there any sort of in-game announcement or acknowledgement when Housley passed Broten in points?
     
  2. reckoning

    reckoning Registered User

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    I believe that Reed Larson was the leader at one point, but Mullen passed him in the mid-80s and stayed in the top spot `til this season.
     
  3. Leaf Lander

    Leaf Lander Registered User Sponsor

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    had lafontaine not got injured he woudl smashed the 502 goal record.

    as far as who is theplayer that christain passed........... i havent a clue.

    brett hull playedfor team usa isnt he considered an american?

    Pat LaFontaine joe mullen Chris Chelios brian mullen Mike Modano Phil Housley Jeremy Roenick John LeClair Neal Broten, Mark Howe, Keith Tkachuk, Doug Weight Bobby Carpenter

    are teh top players offensively in my mind.

    Ifthe record feel at around 200 goals then it must had fallen around 1986.

    i knew a name escaped me.That sounds about right.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2007
  4. Hawksfan2828

    Hawksfan2828 Registered User

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    Thats what im confused about....Brett Hull. Belleville, ONT birth but he grew up in the US.
     
  5. Irish Blues

    Irish Blues Still on hiatus

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    Hence the "U.S.-born" tag.
     
  6. arrbez

    arrbez bad chi

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    meh, that's like saying Stan Mikita isn't Canadian.

    If Brett Hull was born in the states and considers it home, I don't see why people get so out of shape about him playing for the USA
     
  7. pappyline

    pappyline Registered User

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    Brett Hull was born in Canada & mostly grew up in Canada. He gets his US citizenship from having an American mother.
     
  8. Leaf Lander

    Leaf Lander Registered User Sponsor

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    so now that his career is over

    the us doesntwnat brett


    come on back to canada the golden jet
     
  9. EatSleepJeep

    EatSleepJeep Registered User

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    Brett Hull despite being an American citizen is not the same as US born. Many former eastern bloc defectors are considered "American" by citizenship, but certainly are not US born.

    When people say Modano is the best American scorer, they are merely superimposing American for US born...
     
  10. jiggs 10

    jiggs 10 Registered User

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    Pat Lafontaine is probably the best US-born & bred player ever, although Modano is not a bad choice by any means. And if you throw defensemen into the mix, you get Chelios (a top 10 all-timer) and Housley and even Leetch. Not bad company! Joe Mullen was an American Tim Kerr to me. Scored a lot of goals from 7-8 feet out, but took the punishment to do so. Not a great talent, just a very hard worker with a good shot. Modano and LaFontaine are great hockey players, meaning they excelled at all aspects of the game (except goonery) that matter: skating, passing, shooting, stickhandling, leadership, winning.

    Brett Hull grew up in Ontario, Winnipeg, & Vancouver before coming to the US in college (Duluth, Minnesota). He is a dual-citizen, not an American. Stan Mikita was not born in Canada, but moved there when he was very small and grew up there. Slight difference.
     
  11. God Bless Canada

    God Bless Canada Registered User

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    Bingo. One of my university prof's grew up around the Hulls in Winnipeg, was good friends with one of Brett's brothers. (Not former CFL back-up Bart Hull, though). The U.S. gave him the opportunity to play for them when he couldn't crack Team Canada. He could have played for Canada at the World Cups, since they're not IIHF sanctioned, but he chose the U.S.

    I agree with earlier posts: LaFontaine sets a virtually unreachable mark if he stays healthy. 600 goals at least. He was virtually peerless when healthy. And fearless, too. His willingness to go into the traffic areas resulted in a lot of his injury problems.
     

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