Video games as art and collecting related craft

Discussion in 'Geek Emporium' started by guinness, Dec 8, 2018 at 9:11 PM.

  1. guinness

    guinness swedish milkmaid

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    Disclaimer: I consider games as much art, as movies, shows, or books, and part of that, I've also started added some related works to some of my favorite series. I mostly have figurines, but I have an art book of Nier Automata.

    Sometimes I look at retro gaming sites, and I get jealous, as at least some of the NES game boxes, I used to have, and those games even had maps...which over the years, was lost in some way or another. Since as an adult, I've also gotten into collecting old game systems too.

    Since collectors editions are also becoming more prevalent, I can't be the only one. I have the BoTW collectors edition, but I made a hard pass on the power armor edition of Fallout 76 today (the game is that bad). Most recent addition, has been a figurine of Panther (from Persona 5).

     
  2. OmniCube

    OmniCube Kefka did it for the lulz

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    I have two copies of the StarTropics "get the letter wet to get the submarine dive code" thing. :laugh:

    They sure don't make 'em like that anymore.
     
  3. Rodgerwilco

    Rodgerwilco Here mainly for talking about Fantasy Football.

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    I agree with you, friend. I actually think that video games are MORE of an art than some movies/music/books.

    A good video game takes each aspect of the major forms of literary art (cinematics, music, story, etc.) and wraps it all up into one nice neat package. It's kind of like watching a movie, listening to a symphony, and reading a good book all in one.

    Inserts and artwork that come with video games have kind of fallen by the way side, as you said. It's one thing that I really appreciate Rockstar for, because they continue to always put little booklets and maps in all their games. I used to really enjoy thumbing through the manuals and artwork from old games.

    My parents have a good number of Collector's Edition games (World of Warcraft, Star Wars, Guild Wars, etc.) which they've gifted to me, but for myself the only collectors edition that I've purchased so far is the Grand Theft Auto 5 CE. I feel like a goof because I didn't really take care of the box very well, so it's nicked up around the corners and things (all of the items inside are mint condition though.

    I'm the same as you in terms of retro gaming gear. My supervisor at my job just gave me an old Super Nintendo as well as a Sega Genesis that he found in his garage (both still working) and the artwork even on the boxes of the console is just awesome. Everytime I'm in the area I stop at the local video game exchange and pick up at least one or two retro games or poster or something.
     
  4. OmniCube

    OmniCube Kefka did it for the lulz

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    DO WANT
     
  5. Shareefruck

    Shareefruck Registered User

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    Other than the interactive aspect of videogames, I don't see why movies themselves wouldn't equally be like "watching a movie, listening to a symphony, and reading a good book all in one", though. The dialogue/music in videogames isn't any more involved than the dialogue/music in movies is, nor does it have any advantage over it that I can see (or if duration is the reason, over a television series). They're both kind of a marriage of all the base artforms.

    I agree that videogames are art, that some are strong art, that some videogames are stronger art than some movies, and that its peaks CAN eventually be art that's every bit as strong as the peaks of movies, but I don't think we're anywhere close to that yet, personally. Also, I'm a bit skeptical that the interactive element contributes to that in a positive way rather than a negative way. In most instances, taking control away from the artist and giving it to the viewer generally makes things feel less artful, not more. That's generally why I don't like the whole open-world thing-- I prefer when videogames are a more personally curated specific experience because that usually allows for stronger artistic value.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018 at 5:35 PM

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