Sons of NHLers - Good or Bad thing?

Discussion in 'NHL Draft - Prospects' started by JamieG, Nov 14, 2013.

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  1. JamieG

    JamieG Registered User

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    Just a general question to see the opinions of others on the subjects. There are so many prospects/junior players that are sons of former players.

    Obviously there are exceptions, but in general, when a junior player is a son of a former NHLer, do you view that as a positive or a negative?

    Is your first reaction that it's a positive for the player because it means they have access to the knowledge it takes to make it to the NHL level, access to the trainers, what kind of fitness and diet it takes, the best facilities (ie. rich kids that get the best of everything).

    Or do you view it as a negative and with a skeptical eye that the player might be overrated and might get opportunities (both in playing time and being drafted) simply because of their name and in many cases, because a lot of the scouts, GM's and coaches in the leagues are often buddies with their dad's.

    How to you see it?
     
  2. Raym11

    Raym11 Phaneuf sucks

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    i think it's a positive for the kid by far. Like you listed, he has every edge possible outside putting the effort in himself and actually being good.


    Hockey is a really hard game to find the funds to even be able to get where it matters to make your way to the NHL. Thats probably why i find most hockey stories of players from lower-middle class or poor backgrounds making it extremely inspiring compared to other sports. You really have to give it all and put the work in to make it.
     
  3. 3 Minute Minor

    3 Minute Minor Registered User

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    Depends on the player & kid. If the kid thinks his last name will carry him to greatness then no it won't be beneficial. Also if the kid is harassed or given ridiculous pressure because of his last name (Ty Gretzky) then probably another no. If the kid is a sponge & the parent isn't a knob then yes, it can be greatly beneficial.

    There's lots of examples for both good & bad out there.
     
  4. Sivek

    Sivek Registered User

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    I'm always skeptical considering how old boy the NHL is and how exclusive hockey can be compared to other sports.
     
  5. Sticks and Pucks

    Sticks and Pucks Registered User

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    I'm skeptical. I would tend to think sons of NHLers get lots of great support and training early on so they have that advantage over their normal peers. Once they become adults, they don't have such an advantage anymore.
     
  6. puckfan13

    puckfan13 Registered User

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    I view it as a great positive, helps a ton with mental side of things and the character it takes to be a pro.
     
  7. The Zetterberg Era

    The Zetterberg Era RIP Fugu

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    It can go both ways, but I lean towards positive more often than not. Sure there are cases of it being very positive and very negative. It matters on the individual level and it also helps to see what kind of support system the parent provides. I think Ray Ferraro has been very helpful to Landon Ferraro, especially at times when he struggles, he pushes, supports and provides advice that I think has helped him a ton at least in what we know about it that is told to us through the media.
     
  8. Peanut Butter

    Peanut Butter Foodib

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    Depends. Wasn't very good for Ty Gretzky.

    At the same time, Max Domi probably benefited a lot.

    Some players get looks they probably don't deserve either. Keegan Lowe is pretty mediocre, but guess who his dad is.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2013
  9. tony d

    tony d Registered User Sponsor

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    Yeah, it goes both ways. I think that the kid will have expectations upon him if his father was a good player.
     
  10. alko

    alko Registered User

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    IMO this players have a big advantage. They can learn the hidden factors of success. You know, this tiny little things, that can make the difference between good and bad.
    The question is, how much talent they have and how hard they want to work on it.
     
  11. FLAMESFAN

    FLAMESFAN Registered User

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    The name on the back of the sweater definitely helps to open some doors, but so does the wallet of the former NHLer dad. When parents can afford to send their kids to every camp/tournament they for sure have a leg up on those that don't get that opportunity.
    And then ofcourse there's the genes.....
    Quite a lot of sons of NHLers lately.
     
  12. DaveG

    DaveG Global Moderator

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    This is a topic where it all depends on the kid. If they're a total knob they won't be getting farther then their natural talents take them regardless of what coaching or advice they get. If they have an ego and none of the drive odds are they're toast.

    Then you have situations like Paul Stastny, Kevin Dineen, etc. where it just seems like they really took to dads advice and have ended up having nice careers for themselves for it.

    Lowe's been surprisingly decent actually. Won't make the NHL this year or probably even the next but I wouldn't be surprised if he eventually does.
     

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