ATD#7 Jim Coleman Conference Final: Canadiens at Clippers

Discussion in 'All Time Draft' started by VanIslander, Jun 13, 2007.

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  1. VanIslander

    VanIslander Don't waste my time

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    Bob Cole Division Champions
    Montreal Canadiens

    Coach: Jack Adams

    Sid Smith - Stan Mikita - Ken Wharram
    Gary Roberts (A) - Sid Abel (A) - Babe Dye
    Jim Peplinski - Ken Mosdell - George Armstrong (C)
    Tony Leswick- Glen Skov - Ed Westfall
    Tomas Holmstrom

    Brad Park - Keith Magnuson
    Guy Lapointe - Barry Beck
    Barry Ashbee - Pat Stapleton
    Marty McSorely

    Ken Dryden
    Roger Crozier
    Rollie Melanson

    at

    Jim Robson Division Champions
    Nanaimo Clippers

    Coach: Hap Day

    Doug Bentley - Newsy Lalonde (A) - Cyclone Taylor
    Roy Conacher - Adam Oates - Odie Cleghorn
    Paul Thompson - Phil Goyette - Bobby Rousseau
    Don Marcotte - Doug Risebrough - Terry O'Reilly
    Marian Hossa

    Allan Stanley - Earl Seibert (A)
    Babe Siebert - Sylvio Mantha (C)
    Didier Pitre - Bill Hajt
    Ted Harris

    Glenn Hall
    Normie Smith
    Charlie Hodge​
     
    Last edited by moderator Nalyd Psycho: Jun 15, 2007
  2. pitseleh

    pitseleh Registered User

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    To kick this off, I'm going back to the lineup we saw in the series with Saskatoon:

    Doug Bentley - Newsy Lalonde (A) - Cyclone Taylor
    Roy Conacher - Adam Oates - Odie Cleghorn
    Paul Thompson - Phil Goyette - Bobby Rousseau
    Don Marcotte - Doug Risebrough - Terry O'Reilly
    Marian Hossa

    Allan Stanley - Earl Seibert (A)
    Babe Siebert - Sylvio Mantha (C)
    Didier Pitre - Bill Hajt
    Ted Harris

    Glenn Hall
    Normie Smith
    Charlie Hodge

    PP1: Bentley-Lalonde-Taylor-Stanley-Seibert
    PP2: Conacher-Oates-Cleghorn-Pitre-Mantha

    PK1: Goyette-Rousseau-Stanley-Seibert
    PK2: Marcotte-Risebrough-Siebert-Mantha

    This does a couple of things. First, we have a stronger top unit with this lineup. Second, Pitre adds an additional offensive element from the backend. He had a booming shot and will be a key on the point on the PP. Third, it adds an extra defensive presence on the first line.

    You will see us rely on our top-4 defensemen more heavily this series, with Seibert playing around 26-27 minutes a night, and Stanley, Mantha and Siebert playing 22-23 minutes per night. Pitre will get much of his playing time on the PP as a specialist while Hajt will see time on the PK. We hope to limit those two to around 12 minutes per night.

    The Marcotte-Risebrough-O'Reilly unit will get the matchup with Mikita's line while Abel's line gets the Thompson-Goyette-Rousseau line. The expectation is that Risebrough will try to get under the skin of Mikita, who could be thrown off his game and goaded into penalty trouble. We also feel that our fourth line should be able to wear onto the top line physically, as both Smith and Wharram were fairly small. We also feel that our third line will have an easier time generating offense against the second line of Montreal, as those players are not as strong two-way players as their top line.

    Our advantages:

    Coaching: Adams is a good coach, but Day is on another level, a top-5 coach of all time. If we’re going to win, Day will have to be on top of his game, staying one step ahead of Adams.

    Top line scoring: While our top lines are similarly built with tough, abrasive centers between fast and skilled wingers, we feel we have a distinct edge in this matter. Mikita may be the best player on either top line, but Bentley/Taylor have a fairly large advantage over Smith/Wharram in terms of skill. We’ll need scoring from our top line to play a large role in this series.

    Scoring from our bottom-6: We also feel we have a distinct advantage in scoring from our bottom six. Comparing position by position:

    - Thompson was a much more dominant scorer than Holmstrom
    - Mosdell and Goyette were similar players, but Goyette had both stronger scoring seasons and more strong scoring seasons.
    - Rousseau was a more dominant scorer than Armstrong.
    - Leswick has an advantage over Marcotte, as he had two seasons in the top-10 goal scorers.
    - Risebrough and Skov are likely a wash. Neither ever finished in the top-10 goal or point scoring. Skov finished as high as 3rd in team scoring on a very weak Blackhawks team while Risebrough finished as high as 5th on a stronger Flames team.
    - O’Reilly has an advantage over Westfall, he finished in the top-10 scorers once. He also broke 60 points three times, something Westfall never did.

    Overall, we’ll need our bottom six to outscore Montreal’s bottom six to have an opportunity to win.

    Defensive depth: I think Siebert/Pitre/Hajt gives us a pretty big advantage over Beck/Ashbee/Magnuson.

    What we’ll need to overcome:

    Montreal’s Second Line: Montreal has a very strong second line. While Abel is close to Oates when it comes to playmaking, he’s a much stronger goal scorer. Dye has an advantage when it comes to goal scoring compared to Conacher. Roberts is bigger and stronger than Cleghorn and should be able to create room for his linemates better (though Cleghorn may score more). We’ll need our first line to outscore Montreal’s first line more than their second line outscores ours to overcome this advantage.

    Montreal’s Top End Defense: Park/Lapointe/Stapleton has an advantage over Seibert/Stanley/Mantha. We’ll need to overcome this by utilizing our depth advantage.

    Physical play from Montreal's bottom-6: They have two very physical units (though the fourth line is more so than the third line). Our goal is to try to get our top line away from the Leswick line as much as possible. We feel that Holmstrom on the third line is a weakness and that Lalonde will be freer against Mosdell than he would against Skov.

    It should also be noted that I think the goaltending is as close as it can get to a wash. I give a very slight edge to Hall, but that could just be my rose-coloured glasses. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2007
  3. Murphy

    Murphy Registered User

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    Now here's a goaltending battle!

    I tried to think of any way to dis-credit Hall last series but it was pretty much impossible other than to come up with the need for a bigger bucket.....groan.

    I like Mikita of course but the best forward in the series is probably Lalonde. Nanaimo's wingers stand out more for me but then, Montreals defense does the same.

    Its going to take a bit to break down this one.
     
  4. Hockey Outsider

    Hockey Outsider Registered User

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    Good luck Pitseleh & congrats on making it to the final four.

    Here’s my take on the series and some responses to what Pitseleh has said. I agree with a lot of Pitseleh’s write-up, at least in terms of the general strengths & weakensses of our teams.

    Montreal’s Advantages

    Top-end defense: My team’s top three defensemen, a balanced trio that can shoot, pass, defend and hit, gives the Canadiens a significant advantage. Brad Park is the best defenseman in the series, and he will receive aroubd 28 minutes of ice time per game. Park was excellent defensively and used smart positioning and a thunderous, aggressive hip-check to shut down opponents. Park was also a first-rate stickhandler, had an excellent breakout pass, and heavy slap shot. The Clippers’ top defenseman, Siebert, was certainly tough and aggressive but lacked Park’s goal-scoring and playmaking abilities. Guy Lapointe was a speedy, tough defenseman. He was an aggressive hitter and had a great slapshot that allowed him to record years with 28, 25 & 21 goals. Lapointe can clear the puck of the zone, contribute on the PP, and play smart defensive hockey. Stapleton was a strong positional defenseman with a great breakout pass. Lapointe and Stapleton will get around 25 and 22 minutes per game, respectively. (I have Stapleton on the third pair but he will get additional ice time on the powerplay and will be shifted to the top line when the Canadiens are trailing late).

    Park is the best defenseman in this series and Lapointe is arguably second (at worst, he is significantly better than both Stanley & Mantha). All three of my top defenseman can shoot and pass whereas the Clippers have two defenders with minimal scoring capabilities (Seibert & Stanley). All of my top three can hit and play smart positional hockey. Overall, Nainamo’s top three are good defensively, but they lack my defense’s goal-scoring, playmaking and I have the better #1 and #2 defensemen by a good margin.

    Second line: My second line’s scoring ability and playoff performances gives the Canadiens distinct advantage. Center Sid Abel was a tough, scrappy player and a proven playoff veteran. When he retired, he was 4th all-time in playoff scoring, he led the league in goals twice, and finished in the top five in assists seven times (just two fewer times than Oates). Abel won a Hart trophy and was a finalist another year (the only Hart winner on either team’s second line). RW Babe Dye led the league in goal-scoring three times and won two Art Ross trophies. He won the Conn Smythe in 1922 and led the playoffs in goals and points. Gary Roberts is another proven playoff veteran who will use his size and strength to make room for Abel and Dye. Pitseleh says that Odie Cleghorn will be used in the same role for the Clippers—but I’d easily take Roberts (5 inches taller and 30 lbs heavier) for that physical role.

    Nainamo has a solid second line, but they don’t compare. They have no Hart or Conn Smythe winners (while I have Abel & Dye, respectively). They have no goal-scoring leaders (Abel & Dye). Roy Conacher won 1 Art Ross, but Dye has 2 (and Abel & Dye have each been runner-ups). Finally, Roberts is much more suited to the role of creating space than Odie Cleghorn, his counterpart

    Physical play: Nanaimo is coming from a long, close series against a very tough, physical team. This, combined with the fact that they’re a very small team, makes the vulnerable to my team’s superior size. Nainmo’s top line features Lalonde (5’9â€, 168 lbs), Bentley (5’8â€, 145 lbs) and Taylor (size unknown, but I doubt he’s over 170 lbs). They would most likely face Park and Magnuson, two of the strongest and most aggressive hitters of their era. They would also be covered by my third line, which features one positional player in Mosdell and two large, physical checkers in Armstrong and Peplinski. The rest of the Clippers’ lineup is very small too (Adam Oates is the biggest player on their second line, and that says a lot, while Paul Thomson (5’10â€, 180 lbs) is the largest player on their third line). I have superior physical throughout the lineup, with large, strong checkers like Lapointe, Westfall, Roberts and Beck. This distinct advantage, with so many large, physical players relentlessly checking Nainamo’s small group of forwards, will allow the Canadiens to wear down the Clippers.

    Goaltending. I’d take Dryden ahead of Hall for the playoffs. He proved that he could win on weak teams (in 1971 & 1973, before the Big Three was around and before Lafleur was a star) and on strong teams (1976-9). While Hall was consistency and had good longevity, this isn’t as valuable in a best-of-7 series compared to Dryden’s significant advantage in experience. Dryden led the playoffs in GAA 3 times (compared to 1 for Hall) and in save percentage another 3 times (compared to 1 for Hall).

    Countering Nainamo’s Advantages

    Coaching. I agree that Hap Day is the better coach, though Adams (who won three Stanley Cups and was twice named the best coach in the league) is quite solid. I will again emphasize that Adams (who favored tough, two-way players) will get to coach a team that was designed for his style of play (as Mikita, Abel, Park, Armstrong, Westfall, among others, all play aggressive but disciplined hockey with a team-first mentality).

    Top line. I agree that Nainamo probably has a better top line. This will be countered in 3 ways. First, I’ve previously argued that the Clippers lack top-end defensemen that are capable of moving the puck effectively (Siebert and Mantha were both primarily defensive and Stanley’s career high was 35 pts). How will the top line be able to use its skill if they don’t receive many breakout passes, and they can’t rely on their defensemen to join the rush? Of course this won’t stop the Clippers altogether, but it does mean that they’ll be required to waste time and effort on each and every rush. Second, I’ve argued earlier that the Clippers’ top line is tiny and, given that they’re coming back from a grueling series against the league’s toughest team, they are vulnerable to relentless checking from players like Park, Lapointe, Peplinski and Armstrong. Third, as I argued before, the advantage that Nainamo has over my top line is much smaller than the advantage I have over their second line. Even my top line has a Hart, Art Ross and Conn Smythe winner in Mikita, proven chemistry with Wharram, and 3-time all-star, 3-time top-five goal-scorer Sid Smith. In other words, Nainamo’s advantage from their top line will be offset by my second line.

    Bottom 6? I disagree that Nainamo has a better bottom six. They are probably better offensively, but not in terms of overall play.

    - I agree that Thomson is better than Peplinski (I’m using Peplinski instead of Holmstrom this series)
    - Mosdell is better than Goyette. Mosdell was usually the #1 penalty killer and defensive forward on the Candiens; Goyette played behind Claude Provost & Ralph Backstrom, who always got the toughest assignments. Marshall & Nevin generally had the toughest defensive assignments for the Rangers. Mosdell was Goyette’s equal offensively. Mosdell finished in the top ten in goals and points twice, with a small fraction of the ice time Goyette received on the NYR. Finally, Goyette’s production drops off dramatically in the playoffs (from 0.72 ppg to 0.49 ppg).
    - Rousseau is a better scorer than Armstrong, but not a better player. Armstrong was a top defensive forward who usually went up against opponents’ top lines. He’s a large player (3 inches taller and 40 lbs heavier than Rousseau) and will be used to relentless check Nainamo’s small top line. Armstrong gets a big advantage due to his leadership (captain and leader of 4 Stanley Cup champions). Rousseau was a solid two-way player but can’t match Armstrong’s leadership, defensive play, or size & toughness.
    - I agree that Leswick (top defensive forward and two season as top-10 goal-scorer) is better than Marcotte.
    - Neither Riseborough or Skov will score much but Skov finished as high as 3rd in assists and 6th in playoff scoring. Both are probably equal defensively, but Skov has chemistry with his linemate Leswick.
    - O’Reilly and Westfall are completely different players. O’Reilly is a better regular-season scorer, Westfall is much better defensively, both are about the same size. Both score 0.62 ppg in the playoffs; this is a 22% increase for Westfall vs a 9% drop for O’Reilly.

    Defensive depth? I disagree that Nainamo has better defensive depth. I concede that Siebert is better than any of my bottom three. However, while Ashbee and Hajt were both top shutdown defenseman, Ashbee was an all-star, a Norris finalist, and played a major role on the Flyers’ Cup-winning team. Pitre and Magnuson are completely different; Magnuson is a sublime defensive blueliner and Pitre was primarily a speedy forward. At best Nainamo has the better #4, but I have a better #5 and #6 is the ultimate contrast in styles.
     
  5. Hockey Outsider

    Hockey Outsider Registered User

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    Montreal Canadiens’ Fourth Round Lineup

    Coach: Jack Adams

    Sid Smith - Stan Mikita - Ken Wharram
    Gary Roberts (A) - Sid Abel (A) - Babe Dye
    Jim Peplinski - Ken Mosdell - George Armstrong (C)
    Tony Leswick- Glen Skov - Ed Westfall
    Tomas Holmstrom

    Brad Park - Keith Magnuson
    Guy Lapointe - Barry Beck
    Barry Ashbee - Pat Stapleton
    Marty McSorely

    Ken Dryden
    Roger Crozier
    Rollie Melanson


    Powerplay:
    1. Sid Smith - Stan Mikita - Ken Wharram - Brad Park - Pat Stapleton
    2. Gary Roberts - Sid Abel - Babe Dye - Guy Lapointe - Barry Beck

    Penalty kill:
    1. Ken Mosdell - Ed Westfall - Brad Park - Keith Magnuson
    2. Tony Leswick - Glen Skov - Guy Lapointe - Barry Ashbee
    3. Stan Mikita - George Armstrong - Brad Park - Keith Magnuson

    Strategy

    - I will play Peplinski/Mosdell/Armstrong and Park/Magnuson against the Lalonde line. Park and Magnuson were both fast and were excellent defensively. This defensive matchup will allow me to counter the Clippers’ speed, and it will ensure that my two best defensive blueliners, and two top shutdown forwards, are up against Nainamo’s most dangerous line. Park, Armstrong, Peplinski and Magnuson are all large, tough, and aggressive. They will use their size and strength to repeatedly check the Lalonde line. All three players on the Lalonde line are small and exhausted from the previous series and should eventually fade under the constant physical pressure. Armstrong and Peplinski, the aggressive forecheckers, both have a 40 lbs advantage on Lalonde and 65 lbs advantage on Bentley. Overall, the Lalonde line can’t out-stake Park and Magnuson, and they will be worn down physically by Park, Peplinski and Armstrong.

    - Leswick/Skov/Westfall and Lapointe/Beck will face the Oates line. Leswick/Skov were on the checking line of Detroit’s 1950s dynasty, and were (along with Pavelich) given the toughest defensive assignments on the team. Ed Westfall was the top defensive forward and PKer on Bobby Orr’s Bruins (along with Sanderson). All three players are excellent defensively and are qualified to play against the Clippers’ second line. Ed Westfall is larger than any player on Nainamo’s and Leswick is a physical pest and can therefore counter Cleghorn’s physical play. Oates is quite slow and Lapointe and Westfall can easily out-skate him. Lapointe and Beck are both large, aggressive hitters and can therefore shut the Clippers down due to their superior physical presence. All five of my players are strong positional defenders and will use smart, disciplined play to counter the second line’s creativity.

    - If the Risebrough unit faces the Mikita line, then we will exploit the fact that O’Reilly and Risebrough are highly-penalized and are generally undisciplined. Mikita (from’63 on), Wharram and Smith were all clean, disciplined players who learned not to retaliate. Mikita and Smith were tough and could take some checks while still generating offense… and they will take advantage of the Clippers’ penalty troubles on the powerplay. Due to its great speed, the Mikita line will also take advantage of the slow-footed Allan Stanley whenever he is on the ice.

    - The Abel line, with a 2-time goal-scoring leader & Hart-trophy winner, and a 2-time Art Ross & Conn Smythe winner, should match up favourably with the Goyette line. Goyette was never the top defensive forward on his team, nor was Rousseau. Could they handle the pressure of facing such a talented and physically imposing line?
     
  6. kruezer

    kruezer Registered User

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    I think Montreal is absolutely Nanaimo's worst draw possible, Montreal is the team that counters them the best IMO (though I think Speaker's team could have matched them as well) This will be a really difficult series to pick.
     
  7. pitseleh

    pitseleh Registered User

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    Same to you. :)

    I do agree that the offense from your top-3 on defense is a big challenge I'm going to have to overcome. But I do think you underrate my defense's offensive ability. Stanley finished top-5 in defensive scoring 5 times during the regular season and was top-4 7 times during the playoffs. Seibert was a top-5 scorer on defense 8 times. Mantha, in addition to being the defensive conscience of those high scoring Habs teams, was also the leading scorer from the back end.

    Obviously none of those guys were as dominant as Park/Lapointe, but I do feel that they are more than adequate to serve their purpose. I also feel that they fit into Day's system as a whole. We're a team that's focussed around strong team defense, and I feel that they should be capable, at worst, at ensuring clean breakouts from our zone for our forwards. It should be noted that Day's Leafs teams were very successful with defense corps based around strong defensive defensemen like Bucko McDonald, Jimmy Thomson, Bob Goldham, Gus Mortson and Bill Barilko.

    One small correction, Conacher led the league in goals once. And to compare, in his five best seasons, Dye led the league in goals three times and was a runner up twice while Conacher led the league once and was a runner up four times. Dye has an advantage, but the difference between their records is pretty small, especially when you factor in that Conacher missed four seasons during his prime due to the war. I'm not a fan of giving players credit for things they didn't accomplish when it comes to injury, but in an extenuating circumstance beyond a player's control like a war, I think it should be taken into account.

    I'm also not sure what you have for the heights/weights of Cleghorn and Roberts, but Ultimate Hockey lists Cleghorn at 5'9, 195 while Roberts is 6'1, 190 at Hockeydb (and 6'2, 212 at ESPN). He may have put on some weight compared to early in his career, but he's also lost a bit of his edge with age as well. So, even if Cleghorn does give up some size, but he was built very strongly. What Cleghorn gives up in creating space for his linemates he adds in scoring compared to Roberts. Cleghorn was a much more dominant scorer, during his stints in both the NHL and the NHA. In addition, though he does give up quite a bit in size to Roberts, his linemates are also much smaller. Abel gives up 20 pounds on Oates while Dye gives up 5" and 25 pounds on Conacher. While Cleghorn isn't the primary offensive focus on that line, making room for his linemates will not be nearly as important as it will for Roberts.

    I do agree that size in my top-6 is lacking, though I do feel as though I don't think you have a huge advantage. Lalonde/Taylor and Mikita/Wharram is essentially a wash, while Smith was bigger than Bentley but neither were physical. While my second line may be small, between our two second lines, I have three of the four biggest players.

    Physical play from your third line is the decided advantage with Peplinski and Armstrong. But I do think I have some of the toughest players out of either of our teams. Seibert was physically imposing and the only man Shore was afraid to fight, while Siebert was part of the 'S Line' with Nels Stewart and Hooley Smith, which was one of the toughest lines in hockey. He also lay a savage beating on Shore. O'Reilly is one of the toughest players to ever play the game.

    One thing I would like to mention is that when Jack Adams and Hap Day's teams faced off in the playoffs, Day beat Adams three times while losing only once.

    It should also be noted that Detroit was up 3-0 on Toronto in 1942 and proceeded to lose, sparked by an outburst by Adams that caused him to be suspended for the rest of the series in Game 4. It's been said that it was one of the key factors to Toronto's turnaround.

    I obviously disagree with this assessment. While Mikita is the best player between either top line, Lalonde isn't too far off from his level of talent, Bentley and Taylor were both much more dynamic players than either Smith or Wharram.

    On the flip side, Abel was a much more talented goal scorer than Oates but an inferior playmaker (I'm only counting six top-5 assist years, though I may be missing something). So Oates led the league three times to Abel's zero and was top-5 9 times to Abel's 6. Dye and Conacher are very close in production - Dye had 3 top goal scoring finishes and 3 runner ups to Conacher's 1 top finish and 4 runner ups. And again, Cleghorn was a much more dominant scorer than Roberts. So Abel and Dye get nods, albeit slim ones, over Oates and Conacher, while I'd give it to Cleghorn over Roberts. But even if you assume it's a wash for Roberts' physical play, I don't think that difference is as significant as two rather large differences on the first line.

    First off, I hope it didn’t seem like I was insinuating that my bottom-six was better than yours.

    To address the specific points:

    -Thompson is the biggest advantage offensively either of us has over the other. He was five times a top-10 scorer and four times a top-10 goal scorer (3 times top-5). No other player in either of our bottom-6’s compare offensively.

    -I want to address Goyette’s point dropoff first. This is definitely a case of needing context with stats. Goyette played most of his playoff games (nearly 70%) when he wasn’t a primary offensive threat. So obviously his playoff PPG would be lower as they are skewed by the number of games he played as a third liner.
    Second, according to what’s been posted in the History forum by pappyline (in the Richard versus Keon thread), Goyette played on a line with Provost during Montreal’s cup runs, meaning he would have seen the other team’s best offensive players.
    Third, while Mosdell wasn’t his teams’ top offensive threat like Goyette was, he had a much stronger supporting cast. In Goyette’s best season when he finished fourth in the scoring race, the next three scorers on his team included Red Berenson, Frank St. Marseille and Ab McDonald. On the other hand, Mosdell never finished higher than fourth on his own team. That season the three players ahead of him were Boom Boom Geoffrion, Maurice Richard and Bert Olmstead (Jean Beliveau missed a fair bit of time with injury and Lach was well past his prime, so Mosdell had prime ice time that season).

    - I agree that Armstrong is a better player than Rousseau.

    -Leswick is a better scorer than Marcotte, but I think defensively they were very close. Marcotte is considered by many to be right behind Gainey during their era. Marcotte was also bigger, stronger and more physical than Leswick.

    -Like Goyette, O’Reilly is hurt in PPG by lengthy playoff runs before he hit his prime. Between the ages of 25 and 34, O’Reilly’s PPG is 0.78. Westfall didn’t reach his first playoffs until he was 27. Westfall from 27 to 36 was 0.66 PPG (I was going to stop at 34 for fairness, but that would have excluded Westfall’s best playoff and would have lowered his PPG significantly). Essentially, by comparing their cumulative PPG’s, you’re penalizing O’Reilly for starting his career earlier and in a reduced role compared to Westfall.

    Ashbee is a funny case because he only had 4 full seasons in the NHL, while Hajt was a top defensive defender for over a decade. Like you , I’m a fan of dominance over consistency, but I think this is one extreme case where I think consistency should play a role, IMO. A player with four seasons is an extreme case, and though he was very good those four seasons, Hajt maintained his level of play over a much longer period of time.

    This has been fun HO. I have to say your knowledge of hockey history is just astounding. Best of luck.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2007
  8. pappyline

    pappyline Registered User

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    I think this one could go either way. Both are my kind of teams with only a couple of current players & a lot of excellent 2 way forwards. Actually, I think my team would have been competitive with either if I could have survived the first round.

    I really like the centre ice stength on both teams. Guys like Abel, Mikita & Lalonde bring a lot of intangibles to the table.

    Abel was not only a great captain for the Wings but when he moved to Chicago as playing coach in 52-53, he lead them to the playoffs for the first time in 7 years. They also gave the Hab's a scare in the semi's, winning 3 staight after losing the first two but eventually losing in 7.

    Skov was another good pick. Had some decent scoring years with the Wings before eventually becoming strictly a PK guy for the Hawks.

    Goyette was a good pick for the Clippers. He was at best a 3rd line center for the Habs & as Pitseleh says would not get a lot of quality ice time. He probably never saw the power play & also had to compete with Marshall & later Backstrom for ice time. He did put up some decent stats anyway & even better ones when he moved on to other teams.

    One thing to remember about Bentley & Conacher is that they both missed prime years due to WW II which hurts their stats. Conacher actually missed 4 seasons. Both were consistent scorers. If Clippers are looking for chemistry, they could put Bentley with Conacher as he was Conachers centre during the 1949 Art ross year.

    Defensively, both teams look pretty even.

    I must say, I am very impressed with the hockey history knowledge of both GM's. They put together fine teams and their analysis is top notch.
     
  9. vancityluongo

    vancityluongo Twin Benning Sponsor

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    Everytime I've doubted Nanaimo, they've proved me wrong. I believe I had them to only make it to the second round. Here they are in the Conference Finals, with a helluva lineup. I think as this draft has gone on, I've finally started to see just how powerful the Clippers are. I have to say pitseleh, you picked a amazing team out of players that the casual hockey history follower (like I was) would never have even heard about.

    There aren't any Gretzky's, Lemieux's, Howe's or Orr's of the world. Instead, there are key role guys like Hall, Lalonde, Taylor ( both of whom I hear were really good).

    The Canadiens have a amazing team as well, but I say Nanaimo in this one, by the slightest of margins.
     
  10. VanIslander

    VanIslander Don't waste my time

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    Dryden outduels Hall; Canadiens blank Clippers

    NAINAMO -- The Montreal Canadiens silenced the fans at Nanaimo Civic Arena while stunning the Nanaimo Clippers with goals 24 seconds apart.

    Guy Lapointe and Ken Modsell scored midway through the first period and Ken Dryden made 34 saves to lead Montreal to a 2-0 victory Thursday night in Game 1 of the Jim Coleman Conference Finals.

    "We got the crowd right out of the game," said Stan Mikita, who had an assist on the first goal. "That was huge."

    Ken Dryden said it was important that the Canadiens maintained their two-goal lead for the final 2½ periods.

    "I guarantee if we would've given up one goal, they would come hard and get the momentum," Dryden said.

    Glenn Hall had to make just 17 saves because the Canadiens played very conservatively after taking the lead, possessing the puck on offense and blocking shots on defense.

    "We probably could've pushed a little bit more, but we feel comfortable with 2-0 leads," Mikita said.

    Game 2 is Saturday in Nanimo.

    "You know they're going to certainly bounce back and throw some new wrinkles at us and have a lot more energy in the next game," Montreal coach Jack Adams said.

    Entering the series, home ice was regarded as perhaps the only advantage the top-seeded Nanimo had against the Canadiens.

    Montreal quickly took that edge away.

    Lapointe's goal at 9:45 of the first period was set up by a fantastic series of passes around the perimeter, ending with Mikita's cross-crease pass from the corner.

    "It was just bing, bang, boom and it was in the back of the net," Mikita said.

    The Clippers put Montreal's powerful power play on the ice for the first goal and lost the puck in their zone to set up the second.

    Modsell was in the right place when the puck trickled into the slot and he wheeled around and beat Hall with a slap shot.

    "I don't think he knew what he was doing," Hall said. "He just shot the puck and hit the post and it went in. It was maybe a lucky goal, but if you make a turnover, bad things can happen."

    "We would've liked to have a better start, but we made a couple of mistakes and the puck was in the net," Clippers coach Hap Day said.

    The Canadiens seemed right at home in Nanaimo, perhaps because they won a league-high and franchise-record 26 games on the road this season.

    The Clippers had three power plays in the second period -- while Montreal didn't have one -- but they took just four shots.

    Montreal's swarming defense had a lot to do with that, though Nainamo did seem to miss Odie Cleghorn standing in front of the crease to redirect and shield shots.

    "We thought they had four blocked shots on our first power play when we had people in front of the net and the puck never got through," Day said.

    Montreal blocked 13 shots and took 13 shots through two periods and finished with 18 blocked shots.

    Cleghorn missed the game with an upper body injury and the Clippers were also without defenseman Bill Hajt because of an ankle injury and concussion. With stitches around his left eye, Cleghorn said he hoped to play in the series but didn't know if he would be ready for Game 2.

    Even at full strength, however, Nainamo doesn't seem to match up well with the Canadiens' combination of depth, size, speed and skill. That appeared to be the case Thursday night and during the regular season, when Montreal won three of four meetings.
     
  12. John Flyers Fan

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    Lalonde's late goal helps Clippers get even with Canadiens

    NANAIMO -- Newsy Lalonde and Cyclone Taylor answered the call for the Nanaimo Clippers' top players to be at their best.

    Lalonde scored off a rebound with 1:24 left and Taylor's goal started a comeback in Nanaimo's 3-2 victory over the Montreal Canadiens on Saturday that evened the Jim Coleman Conference Final at a game apiece.

    "Taylor and Lalonde won us the game," said Bobby Rousseau, who scored the tying, short-handed goal.

    Early on, the Canadiens were dominant and looked as if they were headed to a 2-0 lead in the series.

    Stan Mikita had a goal and an assist in the first 4:17, and Montreal held onto the two-goal lead until Taylor scored late in the first period. It took Nanaimo nearly 13 minutes to get a shot.

    The Canadiens made a rare mistake early in the third period with a Nanaimo-like giveaway. Rousseau made them pay for it with the short-handed goal that made 2-all.

    Montreal had two power plays midway through the final period, but took only one shot on the first opportunity and three on the second.

    Nanaimo's Glenn Hall made 17 saves, and Ken Dryden stopped 19 shots.

    "We had opportunities throughout the game and Hall made some great saves," Montreal coach Jack Adams said. "But I think about the dumb mistakes we made in the third period that you can't make in a playoff game."

    Game 3 is Monday night in Montreal.

    "Suddenly, we're in a best-of-five series going back to their building," Clippers coach Hap Day said. "I think you're going see us really play, and be even tougher to play against."

    Nanaimo Civic Arena was quiet when the Canadiens jumped ahead early again, but the fans got revved up as Nanaimo rallied unlike the series opener when it lost 2-0.

    The crowd collectively screamed and jumped to its feet when Lalonde scored.

    Taylor carried the puck behind the net and got it to Doug Bentley, whose shot from the left circle deflected toward a swooping Lalonde in front of crease and he beat the sprawled Dryden.

    "We didn't do one thing right in the whole shift," Adams said. "At the end of the game, you're making sure you don't get scored against in the last minute."

    Nanaimo finished strong after a second straight awful start.

    After turning the puck over 27 times in Game 1, the Clippers had two giveaways right away and Paul Thompson's led to Ken Wharram's goal.

    Hall made a lackluster pass from behind the net toward the right circle, leading to Sid Smith's assist for Mikita.

    "On all the goals, we turned the puck over when we didn't have to," Day said.

    Taylor's goal was deflected by Montreal defenseman Barry Beck, giving the Clippers the type goal they scored rarely during recent games against Montreal.

    "It gave us belief and the momentum," Rousseau said.

    Montreal's Brad Park and Babe Dye combined for a giveaway that led to the tying goal.

    "He was looking to give it to me, but I wasn't expecting it," Dye said.

    Park's weak pass in the Canadiens' zone wasn't handled by Dye, and Rousseau pounced on the puck and wound up for slap shot that found the back of the net 1:23 into the final period.

    After the game, Rousseau shook his head in disbelief when asked about the external pressure placed on Lalonde and Taylor -- stars leading the Clippers' new-look franchise.

    "They've been great," Rousseau said. "Taylor missed 14 games going into the playoffs, and people don't realize how tough it is to do that and he's producing. People keep talking about what Lalonde isn't doing, but he keeps answering all the shots at him with great play."
     
  13. John Flyers Fan

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    Smith's power-play goal lifts Canadiens past Clippers



    Montreal -- The Nanaimo Clippers seemed plenty comfortable at the hostile Montreal Forum in the first 30 minutes, skating faster and checking harder than their hosts.

    The Canadiens finally figured out how to escape their midgame malaise when coach Jack Adams shuffled all four of his lines, while Sid Smith redoubled his efforts on his aching knee.

    And Stan Mikita kept doing exactly what he's done all spring: patiently make life miserable for Montreal's opponents.

    Smith scored a power-play goal with 6:21 to play, and the Canadiens came from behind for a 2-1 victory Monday night in Game 3 of their Jim Coleman Conference Final series.

    "Sometimes it takes half a game to figure out how you're going to crack the other team," Adams said.

    Though Mikita added only one assist to his team-high 14 points in the postseason, his fingerprints -- and fist prints, occasionally -- were all over a gutsy victory by the Canadiens, who took a 2-1 lead in the conference final series.

    "Stan sets the tone out there, and we follow him and what he does," said Smith, "He's physical, he's the hardest worker, and he's a great passer. We kept working hard, and we got it turned around in the second part of the game."

    Game 4 in the best-of-seven series is Wednesday night, with Game 5 back in Nanaimo Arena on Saturday.

    Ken dryden made 29 saves in another standout effort for the Canadiens, who jumped ahead in the best-of-seven series in yet another tight, well-played game between tested playoff foes.

    George Armstrong scored the tying goal and added an assist on the winner by Smith, who was injured by a knee-on-knee hit in Montreal's first playoff game against the Montreal Wanderers. Mikita thought the game turned when Adams changed his line combinations, reminding everybody of the game's importance.

    "We play with so many different lines during the regular season that it doesn't matter who we play with," said Mikita, whose lengthy shifts left him puffing when he finally got to the bench. "We had just a couple of good shifts, and when you get two or three good shifts in a row, it boosts your bench."

    Captain Sylvio Mantha scored a power-play goal and Glenn Hall stopped 25 shots for the top-seeded Clippers, who acknowledged they lost the second half of the game by a narrow margin.

    "They got a lot of pressure, and we were almost standing around," said Mantha. "When they get momentum like they did, we have to play stronger defense. I thought we were guilty of taking penalties. It's tough to keep our lines going when we're taking a lot of penalties."

    The Canadiens finally tied it with a rare bit of sustained pressure with 7½ minutes left in the second period. Mikita cycled the puck until it got to Brad Park for a shot, and Armstrong then flicked the rebound into a small space between Hall's glove and pads for his fourth goal of a breakout postseason.

    "Once they scored, they were better than us at that point," Nanaimo coach Hap Day said. "They flipped it in and beat us to the puck, and we turned it over more. It was a flip of the first 30 minutes. That's how I expect this series to go. It's going to continue to be a battle."

    And Mikita just kept wearing away on the Clippers. His relentless pressure forced a Nanaimo penalty in the third period, and Guy Lapointe's slap shot rebounded directly to Smith, who held the puck before he flipped it past a sprawled Hall.

    Dryden shut out the Clippers in the series opener, but Nanaimo rallied back with two third-period goals in a 3-2 victory in Game 2 on Saturday.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2007
  14. John Flyers Fan

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    Clippers rally to force OT, win it on Seibert's goal




    Montreal -- Adam Oates and Earl Seibert rescued the Nanaimo Clippers from falling into a deep playoff hole.

    Oates tied the game with 33.1 seconds left in regulation. Seibert took advantage of two key Montreal mistakes to score the winner on the power play 16:04 into the first overtime to give the Nanaimo a 3-2 victory over the Canadiens in Game 4 of the Jim Coleman Conference series Wednesday night.

    Nanaimo's second comeback from a 2-0 deficit against Montreal knotted the series at two games apiece heading into Game 5 Saturday in Nanaimo.

    "It's night and day for us right now," Seibert said. "It's a huge momentum shift."

    The Clippers controlled the play after falling behind 2-0 midway through the second period, but it took them until the final seconds of regulation to tie it. With Glenn Hall off the ice for an extra skater in the final minute of regulation, the Canadiens appeared poised to take a 3-1 series lead.

    But Nanaimo gained control of the puck in the neutral zone and Roy Conacher fed Oates, who beat Ken Dryden with a wrist shot from just inside the top of the circle.

    "We blew the game in the last minute," Canadiens coach Jack Adams said. "Some people have to take a good look in the mirror why they were in the position they were in on the ice -- cheating on the offensive side of things when the other team has pulled their goalie. If you get on the right side of the puck, nothing bad happens and you don't have to worry about overtime."

    Montreal had its chances early in overtime, but Hall made a nice stop on Gary Roberts to help kill off a power play. Then a delay of game penalty on Pat Stapleton for shooting the puck into the seats helped set up Nanaimo's game-winner.

    With the puck deep in Montreal's end, Barry Beck tried to clear it up the middle, but Earl Seibert batted it down and fired a shot past Ken Dryden for the winner. The puck deflected off Ed Westfall before sneaking past Dryden.

    "I saw he was getting rushed and once I got it I found a passing lane and shot it over Dryden's shoulder," Seibert said. "It had eyes."

    Odie Cleghorn, playing his first game since being injured last series, scored a power-play goal in the final seconds of the second period to start Nanaimo's comeback.

    Cleghorn's goal was part of a stretch when the Clippers outshot the Canadiens 20-1. But Dryden was up to the task and able to keep Montreal in the lead until the final minute of regulation.

    "It took all 60 minutes for us to tie the game," Hall said. "This is what we do. We've battled adversity all year and have been able to come back from it."

    The Canadiens had gone ahead 2-0 on a fluky goal by Roberts, whose shot from inside the point deflected off defender Allan Stanley's elbow and over Hall's shoulder.

    Roberts's goal needed to withstand a replay review before it counted. He shot the puck while teammate Sid Abel was being pulled down by a defender in front of the Nanaimo net. The Clippers argued the call, thinking the puck hit Abel's high stick as he was falling down, but the review upheld the goal.

    Stan Mikita set up Sid Smith for a first-period goal, marking his seventh straight playoff game with at least one point. Mikita has five points in four games of the series for Montreal.

    Roberts's goal came on the first shot by either team in the period. But the Clippers opened up after that and had 14 shots in the final 10 minutes of the period.

    "We had a 2-0 lead and we sat back too much," Roberts said. "Hopefully we learned a lesson. We have to play the same way for 60 minutes."

    The last of those shots put Nanaimo on the board after Abel was called for a cross-check with 9.9 seconds to go. The Clippers won the face off and Didier Pitre shot from the point. The puck was deflected in front of the net and Cleghorn hacked it past Dryden with 5.4 seconds to go to bring Nanaimo within one.

    Nanaimo's power play was 1-for-10 without Cleghorn in his usual spot in front of the opposing net, where he screens goalies, redirects passes and hassles opposing defenders. The Clippers were 2-for-5 in Game 4.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2007
  15. John Flyers Fan

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    Taylor injured; Clippers blow lead but win in 2OT




    NANAIMO -- The Nanaimo Clippers lost top scorer Cyclone Taylor, maybe for the postseason. Then they blew a two-goal lead and watched the Montreal Canadiens dominate the final 48 minutes.

    Somehow, the Clippers managed to win their first overtime playoff game of the series.

    Don Marcotte scored at 8:14 of the second overtime, and the Clippers beat the Montreal Canadiens 5-4 Wednesday night in the fifth game of the Jim Coleman Conference Finals series.

    "We bent a little bit, but we didn't break," Nanaimo coach Hap Day said.

    Marcotte, who scored only seven goals in the regular season, beat Ken Dryden with a shot from the edge of the left circle after taking a crisp pass from Adam Oates.

    "I just saw Oatsey with it, and I knew that if I was going to the net he would either shoot it or pass to me," Marcotte said. "It was a good pass, and when you have speed going at their D, it's tough to defend."

    Game 6 of the best-of-seven series is Friday in Montreal.

    Nanaimo squandered a 4-2 lead after two, an advantage built with three goals in the middle frame after the Clippers lost Taylor, their top goal scorer to an injured right knee nine minutes into the period.

    Day said he wasn't sure of the extent of the injury. Taylor will have an MRI.

    "It could be serious," Day said. "It was like a two-part attack. It was an elbow to the mouth that knocked a tooth out and the knee-on-knee contact, which you've got two of the worst things that we have in hockey ... If that's not trying to hurt somebody, I don't know what is."

    Montreal coach Jack Adams said he studied a replay and didn't see Gary Roberts stick a knee out.

    "It's unfortunate when anybody gets hurt in the game. But looking at it, I thought it was a pretty clean hit. I mean they did collide knee on knee. But there was no sticking out of the knee," Adams said.

    The Canadiens, who stood atop the NHL until March 29 before slipping to the Coleman's No. 2 seed, scored twice in the final 6:55 of regulation to force the first overtime game this series.

    Babe Dye scored his second goal with 7:05 left, and Ken Wharram scored his second of the game with 50.4 seconds remaining in regulation, tipping a slap shot from Brad Park past Glen Hall's glove.

    Park had two assists for a team that went 4-15-1 in the regular season when trailing after two.

    "We let a very good team back in that game and gave them hope," said Nanaimo defenseman Didier Pitre, who scored on a 5-on-3 power play and had an assist. "We were the lucky ones to come out with the victory."

    Newsy Lalonde and Oates each had two assists for Nanaimo. Earl Seibert, Phil Goyette and Doug Bentley scored a goal each.

    The Clippers were outshot 20-16 through two periods and 43-38 overall.

    Dye got Nashville back into the game with a fine workmanlike effort. He fought off Allan Stanley for the puck, then scored over Hall's right leg at 13:05 of the third.

    Montreal had a power play with less than four minutes left in regulation but couldn't score. With Dryden pulled for an extra skater, the Canadiens kept the puck in their offensive end.

    Sid Smith, who missed the final 11 games of the regular season, passed the puck out to Park at the blue line. He one-timed the puck toward the net, and Wharram deflected it past Hall to silence the sold-out Civic Arena.

    With fans snapping plastic clappers handed out during intermission and into overtime, the Canadiens took six of the first eight shots and had several chances to end the game.

    But Hall stopped each one, including a breakaway shot by Ed Westfall that he squeezed between his legs before falling onto his back.

    Dryden had his share of spectacular saves, including stopping Oates on a breakaway 6:25 into the second overtime by stretching out to his left to block a backhander at the post.

    But Dryden could not stop Marcotte when Oates fed the puck to him for a shot that beat the goalie to the wide, right side of the net. Marcotte celebrated by skating over and jumping up against the glass.

    "Luckily, we stuck with it and pulled out the win," Oates said.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2007
  16. John Flyers Fan

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    Mikita, Dryden help Habs force deciding Game 7 vs. Clippers




    MONTREAL -- Ken Dryden and the Montreal Canadiens are going back to Nanaimo.

    Stan Mikita scored, his goal coming on early 5-on-3 power play in the kind of situation Montreal had faltered earlier in this series, and Dryden had 21 saves in his second shutout of the series in the Canadiens' 2-0 victory Friday night.

    "We had to play with poise, stay calm and do good things with the puck. We were able to get off to a good start and went from there," Mikita said.

    "We'll find out if momentum matters," said Dryden. "We frustrated them a little bit. Game 7 will be the biggest challenge."

    "We tried to close them out tonight, but this is why we worked so hard in the regular season, to have that 7th game in our barn," said Clippers captain Sylvio Mantha "One game in our building, in front of our fans for the right to play for the holy grail, can't ask for any more than that [to start the season]."

    "They were the hungrier team tonight and they deserved to win," Nanaimo goalie Glenn Hall. "That's the bottom line. But it's a clean slate now. It's a one-game series."

    Mikita's goal 3:05 into the game got the home crowd into the contest. George Armstrong added an unassisted goal with 12:38 left after Nanaimo turned the puck over in its zone.

    The goal by Mikita was a huge lift for the Canadiens, who had failed to score on other 5-on-3 chances in two losses this series.

    "Kenny was big time for us and the goal by Stan was huge," Canadiens captain Armstrong said. "Capitalizing on the 5-on-3 was big."

    Montreal had a longer two-man advantage in the second period of Game 2, but went 1:55 without scoring in that 2-0 loss. In the fifth game Nanaimo won in the second overtime, the Canadiens couldn't end the game during a 5-on-3 power play for 39 seconds early in the second OT.

    With Hall screened by Ken Wharram in front of the net, Mikita took a pass from Brad Park and shot from the slot between the circles. The puck dinged the right post and went into the net.

    Only seconds earlier after Montreal got the two-man advantage, Hull denied Mikita on a shot that almost went in. The puck was between the goal line and the goalie, who was on his backside, when Hall reached back with his left arm and swiped the puck under him.

    Hall stopped 28 of 30 shots.

    "If it weren't for Glenn, it would have been 7-0. It was not a good game on our part to say the least," Clippers coach Hap Day said. "As far as I'm concerned there was one team on the ice. It was the Montreal Canadiens. They outworked us, outhustled us. ... If we bring this type of game or efficiency on the ice. I don't like our chances."


    Ken Modsell hopped and skated off -- putting no pressure on his left foot -- with 2:20 left in the game. Before getting off the ice, Modsell stopped in front of the Nanaimo bench and threw a punch at Doug Risebrough, who appeared to slash the Habs center's left leg only seconds earlier.

    "It took every part of me to hold back," said Modsell, who plans to play in Game 7. "I went over there for a reason and talked myself out of it."

    Modsell, who was done in the game anyway, was given a 10-minute misconduct penalty. So was Terry O'Reilly after the Nanaimo right wing got involved in the fracas with Risebrough.

    "Our guys really played well in front of me, obviously with the number of quality scoring chances they had," Dryden said. "We took plays away. We're strong down low and that's how we have to play to win games. It's been a defensive-minded series and tonight was no different."


    Notes: Cyclone Taylor did not dress, the result of the knee-to-knee collision with Gary Roberts in game 5. His status for the deciding game 7 is "doubtful".
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2007
  17. John Flyers Fan

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    7th heaven, Nanaimo to play for title




    NANAIMO -- Newsy Lalonde saved the Nanaimo Clippers' season. Doug Bentley ensured that the Clippers would play for the title.

    Bentley scored his second goal with 1:42 left in overtime, leading the Nanaimo Clippers to a 5-4 victory over the Montreal Canadiens in Game 7 of the Jim Coleman Conference finals Sunday night.

    The Clippers will play the Seattle Metropolitans in the Stanley Cup finals, beginning Wednesday at the Nanaimo Civic Arena.

    "I need everybody around me to help. I got that tonight," said Lalonde, who scored twice, including the tying goal with 1:49 left in regulation.

    After Canadiens goaltender Ken Dryden made several outstanding saves in the extra period, the Lalonde-Bentley- Hossa line struck again in their first game together.

    Lalonde took a shot that hit Canadiens defenseman Guy Lapointe and went to Hossa, whose shot bounced to Bentley at the other side of the net. Bentley snapped a shot that hit Dryden and squeaked in.

    "The puck went right to my stick and I shot it as hard as I could," Bentley said. "I was excited when I saw that line on the board this morning. Without a doubt the biggest goal of my life."

    Bobby Rousseau also had a goal for Nanaimo.

    Gary Roberts and Stan Mikita each scored twice for the Canadiens.

    "We just feel like we have enough talented guys and enough older guys that someone's going to find a way to get one in," Mikita said. "We've been resilient that way, but tonight we didn't get it done."

    Robert's first goal tied it at 3 in the second period. He scored on a power play from almost the same spot on a near-identical pass from Sid Abel to give the Canadiens a 4-3 lead with 2:27 left in the second.

    But Montreal seemed content to sit on the lead in the third period, and Lalonde finally made them pay for it. From the left side of the net, Lalonde kicked the puck through Dryden's pads, came around the other side and jammed it in to send the game to overtime.

    "The whole line was unbelievable," Clippers coach Hap Day said of Lalonde's line. "Newsy led the charge, but he had a right wing and a left wing that were right there with him."

    Lalonde, the Clippers' assistant captain, has been dominant in the postseason, scoring eleven goals in 19 games after getting eleven goals in 81 playoff games coming into the year.

    Now, the Clippers, playing without superstar Cyclone Taylor, will play for the Cup.

    "This team has a special quality. It won't quit," Day said. "Back to back seven game series [both going to OT in the 7th game] have left us battered and bruised, but we'll have the home crowd behind us and we'll give Seattle everything we've got."

    A raucous, orange-clad crowd went silent when Mikita scored a breakaway goal to give Tampa Bay a 1-0 lead just 88 seconds into the game.

    But a pretty, backhanded goal by Bentley off a kick-pass from Lalonde tied it at 1. Lalonde then gave Nanaimo a 2-1 lead with a one-timer off a perfect pass from Earl Seibert.

    Mikita's second goal tied it at 2 just 45 seconds into the second period. His slap shot sailed past Clippers defenseman Bill Hajt and just under Glenn Hall's glove.

    "It's disappointing, especially when you are that close," Brad Park said. "Maybe we should have pushed a little more in the third period."

    Rousseau, back on his 3rd line after injuries forced him to play most of game six on the top line, gave the Clippers a 3-2 lead, scoring on a slap shot from a side angle.

    Less than three minutes later, Roberts tied it at 3 with a slap shot from the slot.


    Notes: Cyclone Taylor is expected to be in the line-up for game one on Wednesday Night. Standing Room Only tickets for games 1 & 2 of the Finals go on sale Tuesday morning an 10;30 am at the Nanimo Civic Arena Box Office
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2007
  18. VanIslander

    VanIslander Don't waste my time

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    Just when it looked like Dryden was going to do it.
     
  19. Hockey Outsider

    Hockey Outsider Registered User

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    Great write-ups again, JFF.

    Pitseleh, it was an honor to play against you. Congrats on the win and good luck representing the Coleman conference in the finals. You have a great knowledge of hockey history and know how to assemble a cohesive, well-balanced team. Of course I would have liked to played in the finals, but the Clippers are certainly deserving of the honour.

    (Interestingly, if the Clippers win, Adam Oates, Ted Harris & Bobby Rousseau will become back-to-back Milt Dunnell Cup champions. If the Metropolitans win, there will be no back-to-back Cup winners).
     
  20. pitseleh

    pitseleh Registered User

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    Wow, that went down to the wire. I really thought we were in tough against Montreal, especially without Taylor going into the seventh game. HO, you had a really great team, and it really could have gone either way.

    Thanks JFF for doing such a great job with the writeups. You obviously did a ton of research and work, and it really came across in the description of the games.
     

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