defending against wrap-arounds

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by Goalie_Gal, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. Goalie_Gal

    Goalie_Gal Registered User

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    I'm wondering if any goalies out there have any tips about getting to the post to defend against a wrap-around. I should mention I play inline, so it's probably slightly different than ice? I seem to have no problem moving fluidly to the left post (glove side), but have trouble getting to the right post (stick side) quickly. The only difference I notice is that when going to my glove side, I sort of lead with my stick, and the rest of my body follows naturally. But going to the other side... it's not as natural to lead with the stick. Is it a matter of just practicing more, because you're normally stronger on one side than the other, or is there some other technique to use when moving to that side?

    Thanks in advance...
     
  2. Happy Pony

    Happy Pony Registered User

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    This is drawing from memory (I last played in net about 5-6 years ago) so if anyone wants to correct me by all means go for it.

    When moving to your left (from the right post) what you want to do is have your leading (left) foot forward parallel to the goal line. Pushing off with your trailing (right) foot which would be perpendicular to the lead foot. Then as your lead foot approaches the post you want to stop by turning your lead foot perpendicular to the goal line. You want the skate to be as close to the post as possible. From this position you can drop to a butterfly position, stay standing, or drop to one knee as the shooter dictates.

    The same thing applys when moving from left to right.

    No matter what the shooter will have room somewhere. The most important thing is to give the shooter spots to shoot that you can quickly take away (stop the shot). I have yet to see a goalie stop a shot of mine between his knee and the post, because it isn't a natural reaction to straight the leg aginst the post to stop the shot. That's why you should give them spots you can take away, such as high glove side (where everyone loves to go).
     
  3. Goalie_Gal

    Goalie_Gal Registered User

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    Thanks! I actually have no idea what I'm doing with my feet, so that may be the key. I'll have to pay attention to that. I have a feeling I'm doing that when moving to the left (becuase my right foot is my strong foot) but not when going to the right. I'm playing in about an hour, so I'll check it out!
     
  4. VisionQuest*

    VisionQuest* Guest

    Inline, I have no clue. However, the basic principle I use on ice is to get one padsnug against the post as quickly as possible, and try to wrap my arm around the post. If my leg is straight up, I can then easily push off towards the angle should a pass come instead of a shot. If they take the wrap around long and try to come all the way back across me, Im in a good spot to push slide back to the other post. Again. I dont play inline so I have no idea if any of this would help.
     
  5. Goalie_Gal

    Goalie_Gal Registered User

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    35 and 14, it sounds like it's the same thing, based on what trlewis4 said. And I did pay attention to what my feet are doing and I was right- I was doing it correctly to one side but not to the other. Thanks for the help! Now that I know what to do I just have to practice it a lot to get it as smooth as the other side.
     
  6. VisionQuest*

    VisionQuest* Guest

    ah cool. ,I didnt read it, not enough time. just posted and split.
     

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