Cardio and Strength workout for during season

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by apg96, May 25, 2007.

  1. apg96

    apg96 Registered User

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    I was wondering if any of you guys have a workout for cardio and strength training that you use during season. I play games Friday nights, and usually thats all he ice time i get unless i go play pick up or to sticktime. Ive been out of hockey for a couple years and now i have come back and im still a lil off with stamina and strength.

    If you dont have any workouts, what muscle groups should i focus on. I will do chest and legs and arms of course, but any others i should also put a special focus on?
     
  2. RangersMoogle

    RangersMoogle Registered User

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    For strength training? I'd reccomend high intensity training, yeah, sure, knock it, but it works for A LOT of people. Just do the most productive lifts, those will make up 90% of your strength. Don't worry about the other 10% unless you're a body builder, competitive lifter, or professional athlete. You don't need it. Too many people stress over the last bit of their workout, when what really matters is the meat of it. High intensity training is your best bet to get strong as fast as possible. But keep in mind, if you want to start pushin' around 250 pounds before summer, and you've never taken weight training serious before, you're a lot late. Getting strong takes time, and dedication. Stick with it, and you'll get stronger.

    Since I don't know you, or your body, I have no idea how well, if at all you'll respond to high intensity training, but I recommend HIT because like I said, it works for A LOT of people. The first thing to remember about HIT is WARM UP SETS. If you're pushing around 95% of your one rep max to fail before you do some warm up sets, you're asking for injury.

    Now, there's all this ******** surrounding weight training, about getting strong fast. I don't know what "get strong fast" means, I really don't. To me, getting strong fast, is adding another 200 pounds to the bar in your first year. If you're pushin' 100 pounds on the bench press, you're not going to be pushin' 250 in two months. No way, no how, doesn't happen. You need to get on a routine that works, stick with it, and stick to a proper diet. There's also a lot of ******** around "proper diet". If you're serious about weight training, a strict diet is a given, but if you're a casual lifter, you can get by watching what you eat, and getting a lot of protein in your body. I mean A LOT. Like, at least 1.5 grams of protein a day times how much you weigh (like if you weigh 200, 300 grams of protein). That's AT LEAST. Ideally you'd get 2 grams times how much you weigh. Proper protein intake, and diet can do a lot for your gains. If you eat fast food cookies cake potato chips or any of that **** on a regular basis, stop, or don't even bother lifting.

    Let me stress this; I DON'T KNOW YOUR BODY AT ALL! I have no idea what you can and can't do in terms of strength training, all I can do is point you in a direction, and you'll have to fine tune it from there. Hell, I'm only going to point you in the HIT direction, because LOTS AND LOTS of people will respond to it. High volume routines only work for about 10% of the population, if that. I'm just going to give you some guidelines, and an example of a high intensity, low volume routine so, here it goes;

    Like I said, warm up sets. Figure it out yourself. Is your one rep max on the bench press 200 pounds? Then warm up with something like 100x8, 130x6, 170x4, then a work set of 190 to fail. These numbers are all interchangable, just use common sense. Don't do a warm up set of 180x1, then jump into a set of 190 to fail, and don't burn yourself out doing warm up sets. You should get the idea for warm up sets. Now, lifts to do. Don't hit the machines, get into free weights. Free weights aren't on a static line, and help your muscle memory. Get a barbell, and some weight. The most productive lifts, in my opinion are; Squat, deadlift, barbell row, calf raise, shoulder press, behind neck barbell press, triceps extension, weighted sit ups, weighted crunches, dips, and the benchpress. Everyone does curls for some reason, too. So, I'd do those too. Hell, I do curls for some reason. Everyone does them.

    A good routine, in my opinion, would look like this;

    Day one, legs; Squat, deadlift, barbell row, calf raise, abs.
    Day two, upper body; Shoulder press, behind neck press, bench press, curl, abs.
    Yeah yeah, I said abs on both days. Abdominal muscles recover fast enough so that you can work them out every other day, if not more.

    Do two or three warm up sets, then a work set with 90-95% of your on rep max to fail. Figure out the reps and weight on the warm up sets for yourself. Some people can go 60% x 8, 70% x 6, 85% x 4, then do their work set to fail fine. Other people go 50% x 6, 65% x 4, then 80% x 3, then their work set. Just get the work sets in if you're going to lift to fail.

    Now, do that two days a week (Tues Fri, Mon Thurs, etc), or alternate it Mon Weds Fri, or every other day. Whichever you want.

    It takes trial and error to find a routine that's best suited to your body, and hell, what I wrote most likely won't be the best choice for you, the odds of it being the best are just so, so, so so so so very small. It's just an example. Everyone's body is different, and responds to different things. You have to find what works for you. Or, pay a trainer to find it for you. If you want to go the trainer route, shoot me a PM, and I'll shoot you a link for a guy who works with his clients online. He's cheap, and offers a full refund if his routine doesn't get you any results within three months.

    Take weight training slow and steady, don't run into the gym and start throwin' around more weight than your body can handle whenever you feel like it. You'll never make any gains like that.
     
  3. I might have to integrate that into my workout program, thanks
     
  4. Backstrom #19

    Backstrom #19 Trotz for president

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    work on your triceps.
     
  5. aussie yotes

    aussie yotes Registered User

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    I have a good way to work on your biceps and overall arm strength: put more on your fork.

    (you must be able to use a fork with both hands or you'll end up lop-sided.)
     
  6. Backstrom #19

    Backstrom #19 Trotz for president

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    comb your hair with your other hand works (only if u have long hair)
     
  7. Whiplash27

    Whiplash27 Quattro!!

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    Cardio: HIIT

    I try to do it three times a week with if I play hockey counting as one, so usually twice a week.

    Regular running will decrease muscle mass while HIIT will not. The best way to realize this is to look at runners.
    Distance runners will always be small guys with smaller muscles. Now look at sprinters, they are usually all quite muscular.

    Also, this is a good article about the effects of HIIT, about how with about a quarter of the exercise time (15 minutes as opposed to 60) it burns more fat since you burn fat throughout the day instead of only when you're exercising, increases your VO2max and your Anaerobic Capacity which are both very important for hockey, meaning you won't feel winded as quickly...
    http://www.aminoz.com.au/staying-burning-zone-a-130.html

    Do HIIT, you can do it anyway you want. You basically need to incorporate full all out sprinting with slower paced running to change up your heart rate a lot and also to max out your heart rate. There's a lot of different methods for doing it if you look online. Of course if you're of a novice cardio level you're not going to want to do something extremely hard the first time.

    I've been doing it on a quarter mile track with a full out sprint on each of the straight parts of the track, and then walking or jogging in the curved parts (so basically sprinting about 1/2 - 3/4 of the lap). Then when I'm done I either sit for like 2 or 3 minutes or walk a lap. The sitting at the end and sprinting and slowing down a bit here and there makes it a lot like a hockey shift. It is a bit harder though.

    I've been doing it for about three weeks now and I noticed the difference last time I went to play pick-up with some teammates. We played for a little more than two hours and I hardly rested at all, I was almost always on the ice and was hardly tired. I've also lost a bit of fat around my stomach but I'm still the same weight and my legs look like they may be even a little more muscular than they were..
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2007

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