Trying not to waste away while injured.

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by Escapades, Sep 1, 2011.

View Users: View Users
  1. Escapades

    Escapades Registered User

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So a couple of weeks ago I was driven into the boards during a game and broke my fibula and tore a tendon in my ankle, which required surgery. It's healing up fine (thanks to a plate and half a dozen screws) and I'll be able to play when it's all healed up. However, I won't find myself in a pair of skates again for at least a couple months. Anyways I'm wondering if you guys know of any exercises/workouts that I can do to help keep from wasting away. We are talking mainly upper body and core workouts. My main worry is losing all of the force out of my shot. I've been lifting a little bit but if you guys have anything to add to that I'd really appreciate it.
     
  2. AvDog

    AvDog Registered User

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Littleton, CO
    Home Page:
    I broke my tibia and fibula last year during a hockey game. Thanks to a rod and some screws I can skate for fun now, but I definitely understand your frustration.

    The best thing for you now is rest. If you're missing hockey that bad, play some hockey video games or watch some team drill videos online (don't watch skating drill videos, it'll just make you sad that you can't skate).

    Once your doc gives you permission to use your leg, get on a stationary bike every day. You're going to lose a lot of muscle and flexibility in your leg from the inactivity and surgery. The stationary bike will help you get the flexibility back in your ankle. Unfortunately, there's nothing you can really do about it now.

    Good luck! I feel your pain (literally!),
    -Scott
     
  3. BLBarmada

    BLBarmada Guest

    Take the time to rest and relax, you've got a long rehab ahead of you it seems. Just watch what you eat and eat foods high in protein to retain muscle mass.
     
  4. jwitz04

    jwitz04 Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2011
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    went through something similar in december when I broke my ankle sliding into the boards (7 screws + plate)..I was on crutches for 4 months and have been playing competitively ever since. I would say don't worry about the muscle atrophy..you will keep/gain alot of upper body strength by crutching around trust me its actually a really good workout..and as soon as you start skating again you'll get your leg muscles back again alot quicker than you think..best of luck my man
     
  5. Guffaw

    Guffaw Registered User

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2011
    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Drexel Hill PA
    You guys are scaring me with all this "broke my leg sliding into the boards" etc. I almost did this the other night, but was able to pull my feet up. It's a concern of mine because I'm a bad mix. Alot of speed, but not the best balance in the world and so I hit the ice somewhat regularly while I'm moving pretty good.

    There's not much you can do hockey wise on one leg. Upper body weight training, stick handle on one leg/seated, forearm work, shop for new equipment, read a book on conditioning/strategy, etc.

    Hope you get well soon. Focus on getting healthy and letting it heal right. Hockey rinks don't close for good next week. It will be there when your ready.
     
  6. noobman

    noobman Registered User

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,637
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    84

    You know, the single best piece of advice I've ever received while playing hockey was to slow down.

    When I was still a relatively new player (four years into playing) I had developed pretty good skating speed, but I didn't have the control to support it. I tried to race around the ice and use my speed to make up for my inability to do much else.

    What often happens is that you start moving faster than your mind can react. You fail to see/read plays, you bobble or lose the puck, and you find yourself unable to turn/stop in time and lose your footing, clip someone, or simply collide into them.

    Slow your game down, use your skill (you're probably better than you think) and as you gain more experience and confidence you can incorporate speed into your game again.



    Your best bet is a sports doctor or physiotherapist for that kind of information. A lot of abdominal exercises I know of use the leg muscles a little bit as well, which is a bad idea. I suppose you could do some dumbbell work from a seated position, but at this stage you might be better off resting.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2011
  7. ponder

    ponder Registered User

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2007
    Messages:
    13,900
    Likes Received:
    603
    Trophy Points:
    169
    Location:
    Vancouver
    The fibula is generally one of the "nicer" bones in your leg to break, because it bears very little weight (especially compared to the tibia), for less bad breaks people are often just put in walking casts and can put pressure on it almost right away. Sounds like your break is worse than that, but even still I'd think it won't bother you too much when healed. As for the tendon, which tendon did you rupture? Are you gonna be on crutches for a long time, or in a walking cast pretty soon?

    If you injuries are purely lower body you should be able to do most upper body that have you lieing down or seated, like seated curls, bench press, seated shoulder press, skull crushers, etc. Obviously you'd want to stay away from standing exercises like military presses, standing curls, etc. For core exercises I agree with noobman, ask your doctor/physio for advice. I wouldn't imagine exercises like crunches, twisting crunches, rocky solos, etc. wouldn't strain your tibia or ankle tendons too much, but I definitely be looking for professional advice first in your position.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2011
  8. newfr4u

    newfr4u Registered User

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Messages:
    379
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    i know many doctors simply tell you to rest. you should definitely listen to your body and not do anything that is painful or sets you back. however, rest is NEVER a good rehab. every day of prolonged rest means atrophy for your muscles.

    use this time to work on your mobility and strength, especially your posterior chain. work on dynamic stretches, foam/ball rolling, then progress to split-leg squats (lunges with weight), and eventually barbell squats (start with light weight and add a couple of pounds every time), deadlifts (try to do these as early as possible. start light, add weight every time). deadlifts are really one of the most important exercises for all athletes and especially hockey players. bench (or overhead press) and pullups are also your friends, even if some old timers will tell you otherwise. look into kettlebells when you are ready to add explosive movements.

    one other thing to note, pay attention to your form on all exercises. watch youtube videos, read blogs and books by authors you trust. PM if you need ideas.

    protein advice is good as you need to get enough of it (1-1.5g per lb of body weight), but it won't retain muscle by itself. you will also need progressive load. besides that, take plenty of fish oil and vitamin d. if your bones are taking a little longer to heal, drink lots of milk. don't be afraid to add 20 lbs while you are sidelined. it will take effort to lose that extra weight (cut the calories, increase work capacity), but that's doable and much-much safer than coming back to the game at only a fraction of your former strength.

    good luck on your recovery.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2011
  9. shakes the clown

    shakes the clown Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2010
    Messages:
    439
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago

    wasting away????? Boo hoo poor you. If I miss a couple weeks of hockey I gain 10 pounds:cry:



    Wasting away :laugh:
     
  10. Jarick

    Jarick Doing Nothing

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2007
    Messages:
    25,259
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    St Paul, MN
    Home Page:
    A high fat, moderate protein, low carb diet seems to be the way to go for keeping lean body mass. I don't think you'll "waste away" unless you are extremely lean naturally and have worked your ass off to put on muscle.

    A buddy of mine in high school would lift 4 days a week and eat 5000 calories a day to gain weight. After two years, he put on about 20 pounds. He spent a couple weeks in the mental hospital and lost 15 pounds and had to start from scratch.

    Meanwhile, I have every ounce of muscle mass from lifting or working out very irregularly over the last 10 years along with 30 pounds of fat because my metabolism is the complete opposite.

    Most people are in the middle and will be just fine.
     
  11. Escapades

    Escapades Registered User

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

    This isn't so I can light up beer league. Thanks everyone for your input, this is all great stuff.

    .
     
  12. fuzzerson

    fuzzerson ¡Ãndele!

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    304
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    work your upper body during your down time.
     

Share This Page

monitoring_string = "358c248ada348a047a4b9bb27a146148"