the 24% rollback revisited

Discussion in 'Fugu's Business of Hockey Forum' started by RLC, Aug 8, 2005.

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  1. RLC

    RLC Registered User

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    YEP ! does everyone remember this line.
    " For the good of the game the players are willing to accept a 24% rollback to reset the market"

    This was the Goodenow plan last November. This was touted as a biggest concession in the history of sport.

    SO what do we all see now? Players and thier agents pushing the bidding wars as fast as they can. WHat the NHL and Betman was saying that the 24% was near meaningless that it would all be back inside two years.

    The gm's are working the CAP, the players are destroying the 24% as fast as they can.
    Without the CAP holding things back the 24% would be gone in two weeks. Some concession !! EH Goodenow.

    If the 24% rollback was the be all and end all then the players should be accepting only offers at the 24% rollback price. Then and only then could they state "for the good of the game". The second a players agent held out for a better offer, the 24% was meaningless as Betman thought all along.

    The proof is what's going on right now, the players are holding out for the best offer as usual, even under the cap. Some players will ask to be paid the going price even if they are already under contract, same old same old. Good of the game my foot !!
    Once all the teams hit the 39mil CAP then the bidding wars will stop dead, not before. It's going to take 2-3 years before the GM's learn how to work the new CBA, right now everyone is guessing at everything.
     
  2. ClosetOilersFan

    ClosetOilersFan Registered User

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    RLC - Most of the owners already know how to work the cap. Look at Philly, Calgary, Edmonton, and Pittsburgh. All of them have resigned or acquired franchise players + a couple mid level players + have enough remaining payroll to fill the remainder of their rosters with respectable/NHL Worthy players.

    The odd team will manage it poorly, but that's to be expected. As with anything in life, for something to appear as good, means something else will appear as medocre or poor by matter of comparison.

    Although yes, I agree, the 24% rollback is a joke. Under the old CBA framework, in two years [after most contracts on the old CBA expired], most of the players would have received their 24% back. As far as Goodenow's speech, that was simply a PR move in attempt to sway public support his way; in hind-sight it appears as a dumb speech, but at the time it convinced quite a few fans.
     
  3. RLC

    RLC Registered User

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    Well I am not sure at all about the New CBA.
    We all think some teams have figure it out and are some less, but this is not true. We think does not translate to we know. Not yet !
    The contracts being given out in the last two weeks are one way to test the new CBA. If Clarke thinks he has the over all best way to build a Cup winner over the length of some of those contracts thats his bet. Others have ginven even longer contracts thats thier bet.
    Some are in wait and see mode. The GM stratagy for a long term CUP winner has yet to be established. The free agents will get younger, the Cap might go up or down. It seems to me at this point that CAP room will be king, but again thats an opinion. Add the effect of new rules and the new CBA has the potential to be a roller coaster. Those that sign very long contracts might regret later thier actions. If you were a big market team with the old CBA you knew if you had a player you wanted to keep for a long time you always had the option ( money) to keep him. At 39mil Cap, the money is no longer as big an issue as CAP room. IS in fact, long term contracts the best use of cap space or is it a trap ? I belive that in the long run, the teams that can ice A 3RD AND 4TH LINE that's better then any other will prevail, drafting was very important before but now will become the cheapest way to get some top producing players.
    A cheap set of good rookies opens up CAP room, its a real tug of war on stratagy. Which way is best ? start with 4-6 top rookies as they entre the team, build cap room and then lunge at the CUP by spending the cap room with free agents for a few years ?

    but one thing for sure, if you are a GM that gamble your whole cap room on long term free agent contracts, with out have a great set of rookies at your door step, well those gm's are gambling, if they guess wrong, that team could wallow near the bottom for 3-4 years in order to recover.
    I think it will take 3 years to get the stratagy right. By then you will know the kind of player thats best with the new rules. draft them, hope they pan out,sign fee agents that fit the profile and do it all under the cap.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2005
  4. nyr7andcounting

    nyr7andcounting Registered User

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    Well if you really want to revisit the offer, than you have to remember that there weren't many free agents in November. Had they gotten a deal at that point, we wouldn't see all these big signings because a) only a couple teams would still need to fill out their roster and b) there wouldn't be as many free agents out there to fill their rosters with. Lower demand and lower supply means we would have seen lower free agent salaries than we are seeing now.

    No way would the 24% have been gone in 2 weeks
     
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