Sewing together ripped strap?

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by vinogradov8, Jan 7, 2011.

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  1. vinogradov8

    vinogradov8 Registered User

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    Ok, to anyone who is reading this, a piece of advice: When throwing gear into the washer to get washed (duh), make sure the velcro is attached to that gear.... I threw my hockey socks in the washer with my chest pads and the velco got stuck onto them and started twisting it and almost twisted it off, now I need to sew the strap back on so it doesn't fall off next practice (so disappointed, its sorta new gear too).

    My question, anything better then sewing? I never really trusted sewing to be a permanent fix. Maybe with fishing line? (omg yes, 150 lbs braid fishing line... well seee).
     
  2. densetsu

    densetsu Registered User

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    I'm partial to riveting materials together. I've riveted straps to my goalie pads, and have riveted the arms onto my goalie C/A when the original eyelets-and-laces method of attaching them started to become a pain in the neck.

    The arms on the C/A could eventually come off, because the nylon might tear in the future -- but they've held together strong for the last two years so far. And riveting leather straps to leather (well, jenpro) pads? That **** ain't going anywhere.
     
  3. LarryO

    LarryO Registered User

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    Just use extra strong sewing thread. If you try to break that kind of thread with your bare hands, it will cut through your skin before it breaks.
     
  4. vinogradov8

    vinogradov8 Registered User

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    Haha, alright, thanks to you both! Go do a womans job and sew some stuff together haha.
     
  5. greyraven8

    greyraven8 Registered User

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    usually the stonger/thicker thread is called buttonhole thread.
    just go to your local fabric shop.


    have used it for various repair jobs.
    usually use a needle with a triangular sided shaft, but any bigger/thicker needle should do the job.
     
  6. cptjeff

    cptjeff [insert joke here]

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    What you want is a sewing awl, and the heavy waxed thread that comes with it. They're easy to use, and the rest of the gear will break before the stitch.

    Also, you shouldn't be washing your pads much. Only every once in a while, and only ever in a front loading washer. They should just be aired out after each skate, a washing machine puts too much stress on equipment for regular use.
     
  7. BlackDog13

    BlackDog13 Registered User

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    Your gear will disintegrate into a pile of rubbish before you break 150 lb. braid. As another poster suggested, a sewing awl with waxed cotton thread is the way to go.
     

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