Russian Chant Question from an Ignorant American

Discussion in 'International Tournaments' started by dan716, Jan 4, 2011.

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  1. dan716

    dan716 Registered User

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    As a Buffalo guy, I've been to a bunch of the WJC games, 3 of which have been Russian games (including the Finland quarterfinal). I've had the pleasure of sitting near a bunch of awesome Russian fans, who have been doing a two primary chants. One of them is obvious (ROOS-EE-YAH), but the other sounds like SCHI-BORE, and they tend to do it when Russian has the puck in the attacking zone. My friends and I have been wondering what they've been saying and what it means, can anyone enlighten us? Thanks!
     
  2. cska78

    cska78 Registered User

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    it's "shaybu!" shayba is a puck, shaybu - we want/need a goal.
     
  3. dan716

    dan716 Registered User

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    that's totally it, thank you!
     
  4. vorky

    vorky @vorkywh24

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    (ROOS-EE-YAH)

    That seems to be Rossiya (Россия), which means Russia

    look at wiki and listen it

    Edit: My fault, you understand this word...
     
  5. 4Isles4*

    4Isles4* Guest

    it means the Petrov is COMING!!!!
     
  6. Jeb99

    Jeb99 Registered User

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    Been wondering about this too. Are you saying that "Shayba" is puck and by just adding a "U" instead of an "a" the meaning switches to "we want/need a goal"?

    Edit. Sorry for bumping an old thread like that. I was looking for the 2011 whc thread and forgot I was at like at page 151....
     
  7. Jerzey Devil

    Jerzey Devil Taylor, Egg, and Cheese

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    You aren't ignorant for not knowing a foreign language.
     
  8. PenDuhNotPittsburgh

    PenDuhNotPittsburgh Registered User

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    Nope shaybu and shayba both just mean puck. It's just bye adding the u-ending you say that you do something with the object that you add the u to. That's how it just goes in slavic languages.
    In English you'd say "tell him" while in Russian you'd say "Govory emU", you'd say "beat him up" in English while in Russian you'd say "day emU".
    It's just an aspect of the gramar/synthax
     
  9. Eisen

    Eisen Registered User

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    Shaybu shaybu is also a name of a Russian hockey comic movie from the 60s. It's very sweet.
     
  10. ilsuonatorejones

    ilsuonatorejones Registered User

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    "Shaybu" is an accusative, i. e. a direct object; it's means that "the puck" is the object of an action: the verb and the subject are implied.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2017
  11. Loffer

    Loffer Registered User

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    All in all - given the fact a literal translation is an illusion and pipe dream - we are entitled to do the following interpretation from Slavic Russian to Anglosaxian English-American:

    "Shaybu!" --> "Shoot it, you moron!" :popcorn:
     
  12. Eisen

    Eisen Registered User

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    More like "shoooooot".
     
  13. Kshahdoo

    Kshahdoo Registered User

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    It's more like a short version of a phrase "we want the goal" or "we want another goal" (hotim shaibu or hotim esche odnu shaibu).
     
  14. Zine

    Zine Registered User

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    Translations and semantics aside, it means 'we want a goal'.
     
  15. Theokritos

    Theokritos Moderator

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    Funny fact: шайба (shayba) is a word the Russian language borrowed from German (Scheibe = "disc"), like quite a few other terms. Another hockey-related example: штраф /shtraf ("penalty"), from German Strafe ("punishment", "penalty").
     
  16. Eisen

    Eisen Registered User

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    I was wondering that, too.
     
  17. BlitzSnipe

    BlitzSnipe Registered User

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    The interesting thing is, the Russian word 'Shayba' (шайба) comes from the German word 'Sheibe', meaning, among other things, disc.
     
  18. The Gloaming

    The Gloaming Free Jesper Fast

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    The Russian language also didn't bother changing the German word for sandwich into something more Russian-sounding. It's the exact same word.
     
  19. kp61c

    kp61c tovarisch maxim - schas chelust slomau

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    the best answer, ty
     
  20. KirkW

    KirkW Registered User

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    So they say Sandwich? :sarcasm:
    Butterbrot is a pretty ridiculous word that I've never actually heard in real conversations / interactions (in German, I mean).
    Although, perhaps it's a regional thing.
     
  21. kp61c

    kp61c tovarisch maxim - schas chelust slomau

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    more like booterbrod in russian. beautiful, love it
     
  22. HR Pickens

    HR Pickens Registered User

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    Not to get nitpicky but not knowing a foreign language is the very definition of ignorance. Maybe you mean it's nothing to feel bad about or it's not a negative but not knowing something is being ignorant to it.
     
  23. Vipers31

    Vipers31 Advanced Stagnostic

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    I'd say it's regional, then. I mean, I am in my thirties and I don't have kids, so it's not exactly in my most active vocabulary, but I wouldn't call it a particularly unused word.
     
  24. NYRFANMANI

    NYRFANMANI beyond good and evil

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    Me too.


    That's ****ing awesome.
     
  25. Trovatore

    Trovatore Registered User

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    It's kinda funny that the English word for 'a (hockey) stick' is... well, just 'a stick', literally "a long slender piece of wood or metal" (Merriam Webster dict.). In Russia we have a distinct word for this thing - 'клюшка'. I think in other languages - Finnish, German, Swedish, Czech, French, etc - this is the case too? Anybody?
     

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