Russia hockey video thread

Discussion in 'Russia' started by MrGeno101, Aug 30, 2011.

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  1. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    Hi!

    I made i tribute to one of the greatest hockey player in the world Valeri Kharlamov. Sadly i wasn't born when he played but from old games and clips he was a dominant player for that era. I thought u hfboard friends may enjoy this tribute :)

     
    Last edited: May 31, 2012
  2. yunost

    yunost Registered User

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    great vid
     
  3. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    One of the most exciting player ever, Pavel Bure Tribute



    next in line Sergei Fedorov...
     
  4. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    Sergei Fedorov

     
  5. Yakushev72

    Yakushev72 Registered User

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    Luckily for me (or sadly, depending on how you look at it), I was alive to see Kharlamov play. IMHO, he was the most explosive and exciting forward in the history of all hockey, NHL included. You can argue that Gretzky had a bigger bag of tricks than Kharlamov, but Gretzky lacked the speed and ability to control the puck and change directions while accelerating to greater speed that Kharlamov was the master at.

    The most amazing and unbelievable thing about Kharlamov was his ability to stickhandle in alone against two, three or even four defenders, plus the goaltender, and the only time thing that anything ever touches anything else is when the puck touches the back of the net. In the clip that you provided, there are two rushes by Kharlamov that illustrate what I'm talking about.

    About the middle of your video clip, from Game 1 of the 1972 Series in Montreal, you will see Kharlamov (in white) coming in alone on two Canadian defensemen (one is Don Awrey of the Boston Bruins - I forget the other one's name). These are all NHL All-Star defensemen, among the best that Canada had produced. Kharlamov comes in alone on them, dips his left shoulder, then blows by them to the outside untouched. He comes in alone on Ken Dryden and easily deposits the puck in the back of the net.

    In the other clip, the very last one on your video, in a game between the New York Rangers and CSKA at Madison Square Garden on December 28, 1975, Kharlamov comes in alone against four Ranger defenders (yes, count them, there are four). The Rangers are lined up tightly along the blue line, but Kharlamov dekes right and left and goes by all four of them without being touched, and comes in on John Davidson, the goaltender and puts the puck by him cleanly. He went through a total of five guys by himself, and nobody touched anything until the puck touched the back of the net. I have never seen anything like that before or since.

    Among Russians, Sergei Makarov and Pavel Bure came closest to matching Kharlamov's skills, but in the end, I believe that Kharlamov was in a class by himself.
     
  6. VMBM

    VMBM Crawfish Fiesta

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    Sergei Makarov says hi. To me, the greatest 1-on-1 player whose name is not Mario Lemieux.

    I haven't seen enough of Anatoli Firsov, but I think he might have been a more complete package, though not quite as dazzling.
     
  7. Yakushev72

    Yakushev72 Registered User

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    I saw him once! Very strong and great hands, with a style very similar to Gordie Howe of that era. He was never tested against NHL pros, so it is hard to compare him, but I think he would have done very well.
     
  8. Yakushev72

    Yakushev72 Registered User

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    Oddly enough, Firsov was available to play in the 1972 Series, but at age 32, he was considered to be too old. Tarasov and his minion, Bobrov, didn't believe in using players older than 30 on the national team. Firsov was in great shape at 32, and it is interesting to think what might have happened if he had played (although, by the same token, Canadians could equally speculate what might have happened if Orr and Hull were available).
     
  9. VMBM

    VMBM Crawfish Fiesta

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    No, I think that if Tarasov & Chernyshev (who both quit/were fired after the 1972 Winter Olympics) had still been the coaches, Firsov would have played. I mean, even the old & slow Starshinov played one game in the series (game 2). But Firsov and Bobrov were apparently like a cat and a dog. It seems likely, though, that if Firsov had still been in his prime, he would have been chosen, no matter what the personal relationship between him and B. was.

    I've never punished Firsov much for not playing the pros, by the way; I'm pretty certain he would have 'passed the test' with flying colours, just like (almost) all the other Russians.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2011
  10. Yakushev72

    Yakushev72 Registered User

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    Tarasov returned for a brief period after the 1972 Series to coach CSKA/the National Team. There is some suggestion that he was held out of the '72 Series, and then fired during the 1973/74 season, by the Defense Minister, who apparently meddled in CSKA affairs in his capacity as head of the armed forces. IMHO, Tarasov was the most brilliant mind in the history of coaching hockey, but politics always supersedes.

    Bobrov was never more than a figure-head, and got in trouble after the '72 Series for punching a party official while he was drunk. You have to wonder whether Tarasov himself would have squandered the 3-1-1 lead, with three home games remaining, the same way that Bobrov did in 1972? Tarasov was replaced by Kulagin from Krylya in 1974, but by 1976, was removed after mediocre achievements with great talent. Tikhonov, who was a minion of Tarasov, brought Tarasov's intensity and relentlessness, and took the program in a direction that Tarasov approved of.
     
  11. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    Thanks for your input :handclap:, always nice to read stuff from people who actually has seen these hockey legends play and who know what they talk about.
     
  12. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    Next in my series of russian legend is Alexander Mogilny. Hope u enjoy

     
    Last edited: May 31, 2012
  13. Yakushev72

    Yakushev72 Registered User

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    Mogilny had the whole package - blinding speed, great control and balance on his skates, magic hands as a stickhandler, and a deadly shot, either as a wrist shot or slap shot. It would have been interesting to see what effect another year of two with CSKA might have had in skills development.
     
  14. Fulcrum

    Fulcrum Guest

    Interestingly enough, Mogilny was arguably the most skilled and talented maple leaf in their long history. Of course Sundin was the man too, but he just wasn't as special. Being a leafs fan and watching Mogilny play was absolutely amazing.

    I personally took a lot from his game for my hockey days.
     
  15. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    And next legend is Sergei Makarov. Hope u enjoy

     
  16. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    Sundin was more of a leader i think. He was really good but not so pure skilled and exciting as Mogilny was. It was Sundins leadership who made him so popular in sweden., but i agree Mogilny was amazing and really fun to watch :)
     
  17. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    My second version of why i love Russian hockey :D

     
  18. Yakushev72

    Yakushev72 Registered User

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    Mulle,

    Thanks once again for reminding me why I love Russian hockey. As far as I am concerned, I could care less about the big heavy hits and bumping and grinding. I love the dazzling and brilliant stickhandling and puck control plays. I think kids dream of skating end to end, faking out all five defenders, and depositing the puck behind a sprawling goaltender. That, to me, is what makes Russian hockey unique.
     
  19. Alessandro Seren Rosso

    Alessandro Seren Rosso Registered User

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    Well said. I couldn't say it better myself!
     
  20. Botta

    Botta Registered User

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    Told guy at work I was going to do comeback after 15 years of no playing.(Bet I will be quite rusty:help:) IHe told me that he expected to see me with black eyes and broken teeth.I told him that for me hockey is a sport with finesse and skills even though I know many like the other kind of hockey(meaning a brawl)
     
  21. Yakushev72

    Yakushev72 Registered User

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    The NHL is the only major sports organization in the world that I am aware of that actually tolerates and accepts fighting as "part of the game." It is a sad state of affairs that this past summer, three "enforcers" who had suffered from chronic depression, Derek Boogard (Wild), Rick Rypien (Rangers) and Wade Belak (Predators) committed suicide (in the case of Boogard, a drug and alcohol overdose was the official cause of death, with suicide only suspected). I'm not a doctor, but I have to believe that repeated blows to the head by 230-pound players whose only job in hockey is to fight caused the wiring in their brains to go askew.

    The KHL has had a disturbing trend of fighting lately, as evidenced by Vityaz with Darcy Varot, Gratton and Simon beating people to a pulp for the entertainment of the fans. That is one facet of the NHL that the KHL must take steps to strictly avoid. Why not enjoy the talents of Radulov, Afinogenov, Tarasenko and Kuznetsov, instead of Varot and Gratton?
     
  22. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    :nod:
     
  23. Botta

    Botta Registered User

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    100% agree with you.That the bosses accept fighting to the degree they do is very sad.They accepy fighting as a part of the game because they are afraid that many will turn their backs to the game.I belive many will turn their back to the game because of the violence, not the opposite.I guess they need a major accident because of a fight to take action.If hockey wants to evolve and attract both more fans and athletes the bosses need to clean up a bit.Let`s enjoy the most talented guys out there instead of goonery.
    I pray that the russian hockey tradition will continue and that Vityaz change their way.
     
  24. Yakushev72

    Yakushev72 Registered User

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    I think you are totally correct when you say that pro leagues are afraid to let it go because they think the fans will turn on them. The NHL has franchises in many warm weather places (Miami, Dallas, Phoenix, Los Angeles, etc.) where kids don't play hockey in yard rinks growing up, where their only impression of hockey is the fighting and violence. But retaining the violence, in my opinion, risks marginalizing the sport. IMHO, nothing looks dumber than two goons with their sweaters pulled over their heads thrashing away at air. I would love to see fighting eliminated as part of the game.
     
  25. MrGeno101

    MrGeno101 Registered User

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    Pavel Datsyuk show :yo::yo:

     

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