NHL's Best Succession Plan

Discussion in 'The History of Hockey' started by Stephen, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. Stephen

    Stephen Registered User

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    In the history of the NHL, what was the best succession plan? By that, I mean in what scenario was a team able to replace an old veteran star player and leader of the team with a young gun without losing a beat, going on to experience a lot of success with the new player, maintaining the tradition of excellence? Something along the lines of a Bobby Orr to Ray Bourque or Jean Beliveau to Guy Lafleur or more recently, perhaps Joe Sakic to Matt Duchene.
     
  2. steve141

    steve141 Registered User

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    The succession plan for Orr was Park, not Bourque.

    In my mind a good succession plan is where you don't lose a step in the process. The Avs were terrible for a few years until the young guns could start to fill in the gap from Sakic/Forsberg.

    The 50s-70s Canadiens is probably the best example of sustained greatness, so I guess the answer to your question should be somewhere there.

    For a more current example, Detroit's shifting from the 90s of Shanahan, Yzerman, Fedorov, Murphy to the 00s of Zetterberg, Datsyuk, Chelios and Rafalski was pretty smooth.
     
  3. Sumoki Dachiba

    Sumoki Dachiba Registered User

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    I would say Lemieux to Crosby is probably close to if not the best of all time, definitely the best recently. And wasn't it Orr to Park to Bourque?
     
  4. Zil

    Zil Shrug

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    What are you talking about? The Penguins were awful for years before they got Crosby. The OP is talking about a contender who stayed a contender while switching from one generation of players to the next.
     
  5. Derick*

    Derick* Guest

    Leafs had a very smooth succession of being bad with Sundin/McCabe/Antropov to being bad with Kessel/Phaneuf/Grabovski :sarcasm:
     
  6. TheDevilMadeMe

    TheDevilMadeMe Registered User

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    It has to be the Canadiens ripping off desperate expansion teams to get the #1 pick in the draft allowing them to draft Guy Lafleur.

    From Sam Pollock's entry on wikipedia:

     
  7. JaymzB

    JaymzB Registered User

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    Elmer Lach to Jean Beliveau?
     
  8. Sumoki Dachiba

    Sumoki Dachiba Registered User

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    Yah sorry man, I guess the Sakic to Duchene comment threw me off. I read the OP as 'without missing a beat' in terms of having a top notch star player. In my defense, it was late and it was not explicitly stated in the OP that the team in question was hugely successful immediately prior to the player switch, just that it had a 'tradition of excellence'.

    In terms of team success the Detroit teams of the 1990-2000s and Habs from the 50's to 70's were all pretty fluid. It's hard to think of one 'player for player' succession where a retiring vet was immediately replaced by a new hero. Maybe Yzerman to Datsyuk qualifies.

    How about Newsy Lalonde to Howie Morenz? There was a small gap between them but I think that it is a pretty good example of a solid succession plan.
     

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