New York City Thread: Part III (Info in OP)

Discussion in 'New York Rangers' started by Chief Ranger, May 12, 2017.

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  1. Chief Ranger

    Chief Ranger Try Not To Suck

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    Location:
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    Traditional Tourist Attractions
    • Empire State Building
    • Statue of Liberty
    • South Street Seaport
    • Rockefeller Center / Channel Garden / NBC Studios
    • Metropolitan Museum of Art
    • Grand Army Plaza and environs (FAO Schwarz, Apple Store, Plaza Hotel, Central Park South)
    • Central Park (Including Central Park West and Fifth Avenue)
    • United Nations
    • American Museum of Natural History
    • Rose Center for Earth and Space
    • The Guggenheim Museum
    • USS Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum
    • Ellis Island Immigration Museum
    • Greenwich Village
    • SoHo
    • Little Italy/Chinatown
    • Theatre District
    • Madison Avenue shopping
    • A Broadway show
    • An Off-Broadway show
    • Shopping at Macy’s or Bloomingdale’s
    • Ground Zero/9-11 Memorial Museum/Winter Garden
    • Times Square/Madame Tussaud’s
    • New York Public Library and Bryant Park
    • St. Patrick’s Cathedral
    • Trump Tower
    • Circle Line
    • St. Bartholomew’s Church

    Sports and Nightlife
    • New York Yankees baseball (April to October)
    • New York Mets baseball (April to October)
    • New York Rangers hockey (October to April)
    • New York Islanders hockey (October to April)
    • New Jersey Devils hockey (October to April)
    • New York Knicks basketball (October to April)
    • Brooklyn Nets basketball (October to April)
    • New York Giants football (September to January)
    • New York Jets football (September to January)
    • New York Red Bulls soccer (March to October)
    • New York City FC soccer (March to October)
    • Taping of a television show
    • Tour of Madison Square Garden
    • Tour of Radio City Music Hall
    • Christie’s Auction House / Sotheby’s
    • Carnegie Hall
    • Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts / Juilliard School
    • New York Philharmonic / Metropolitan Opera
    • Brooklyn Academy of Music
    • Apollo Theatre

    More Museums
    • The Whitney Museum of American Art
    • Museum of Modern Art
    • Tenement Museum
    • The Brooklyn Museum
    • Museum of the Moving Image
    • Jewish Museum
    • New York City Fire Museum
    • New York City Police Museum
    • New York City Transit Museum
    • Pierpont Morgan Library
    • Forbes Galleries
    • New Museum of Contemporary Art
    • El Museo del Barrio
    • The Paley Center for Media (Museum of Television and Radio)
    • Jewish Heritage Museum
    • Children’s Museum of Manhattan
    • Museum of American Folk Art
    • The Frick Collection
    • The New York Historical Society
    • Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum
    • Grey Art Gallery
    • Mount Vernon Hotel Museum
    • The Studio Museum in Harlem
    • New York Hall of Science
    • Queens Historical Society
    • Queens Museum of Art
    • The Museum of Arts and Design
    • Asia Society Galleries
    • Audubon Terrace
    • Bronx Museum of the Arts
    • China Institute
    • Dia Center for the Arts
    • International Center of Photography
    • Alice Austen House Museum
    • Bartow-Pell Mansion
    • Isamu Noguchi Garden Museum
    • Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art
    • Japan Society of New York
    • Museum for African Art
    • Museum of American Illustration
    • Museum of the City of New York
    • National Academy of Design Museum
    • National Museum of the American Indian
    • Bard Graduate Center Library and Gallery
    • The Drawing Center
    • Neue Galerie / Goethe Institut
    • Noble Maritime Collection
    • Van Cortlandt House Museum
    • Dyckman Farmhouse Museum
    • Edgar Allan Poe Cottage and Museum
    • Hispanic Society of America
    • Dahesh Museum of Art
    • Pieter Claesen Wyckoff House Museum
    • John M. Mossman Lock Museum
    • Museum of American Finance
    • Museum of Biblical Art
    • Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art
    • Museum of Mathematics
    • Maritime Industry Museum at Fort Schuyler
    • Valentine-Varian Museum of Bronx History

    More Landmarks and Outdoor Activities
    • Grand Central Terminal
    • Chrysler Building
    • Woolworth Building
    • Street fair / parade / Feast of San Gennaro
    • The High Line
    • Central Park Zoo
    • Bethesda Terrace
    • Stonewall Inn / Gay Village
    • Chelsea
    • Chelsea Market
    • Chelsea Piers
    • Madison Square Park / Flatiron Building
    • Meatpacking District
    • Harlem / El Barrio
    • Randall’s Island / Wards Island
    • Time Warner Center / Columbus Circle
    • Washington Square Park / New York University / St. Mark’s Place
    • Union Square
    • The Dakota
    • Columbia University / Morningside Heights
    • Grant’s Tomb / Riverside Park
    • Trinity Church and Graveyard
    • The Cloisters / Fort Tryon Park
    • Eldridge Street Synagogue
    • Lower East Side
    • Upper East Side / Yorkville
    • Gracie Mansion / Finley Walk / Carl Schurz Park
    • Houston Street Film Row
    • New York City Hall / Foley Square / Park Row
    • Battery Park
    • Financial District / New York Stock Exchange / Federal Hall
    • Roosevelt Island / Four Freedoms Park / Tramway
    • Cathedral of St. John the Divine
    • Bronx Zoo
    • Loeb Boathouse
    • Brooklyn Bridge
    • Governor’s Island
    • Castle Clinton
    • Hamilton Grange National Memorial
    • Morris-Jumel Mansion
    • St. Paul’s Chapel
    • Queens Zoo
    • Herald Square
    • Coney Island
    • Brooklyn Brewery
    • Brooklyn Botanical Garden
    • New York Botanical Garden
    • Staten Island Botanical Garden
    • New York Aquarium
    • Prospect Park
    • South Ferry / Bowling Green
    • Fraunces Tavern / Stone Street / Hanover Square
    • Riverside Church
    • Conservatory Garden / Harlem Meer
    • Spuyten Duyvil / Riverdale
    • Wave Hill
    • Brooklyn Heights
    • Tribeca
    • Cobble Hill / Boerum Hill
    • Williamsburg
    • DUMBO
    • Park Slope
    • Long Island City
    • Flushing Meadows / National Tennis Center
    • Pelham Bay Park / Orchard Beach


    Best Views of the City

    - Top of the Rock in Rockefeller Center has the best view of the city in my opinion, a bit better than the Empire State building.

    - Best way to see the Statue of Liberty is by doing a loop on the Staten Island ferry, you go right past the statue and get a great view. And it’s only a couple dollars to take the ferry out to Staten Island and back to Manhattan.

    - Brooklyn promenade in Brooklyn Heights has a great view of lower Manhattan. Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge, get some Grimaldi’s (see below), and check out the view from the promenade.

    Bars/Pubs

    - Standings – Awesome sports bar in the village, good craft beer selection. 43 E 7th St, New York, NY

    - The Pony Bar – Great variety of craft beer on the west side of Manhattan. 637 10th Ave

    - Beer Culture – More craft beer! 328 W 45th St New York, NY 10036

    - McSorley’s Old Ale House – Very traditional NYC bar in the East Village, which is a great place to check out at night (close to NYU). They only have two types of beer – dark or light. 15 E 7th St New York, NY

    - Bohemian Hall & Beer Garden – Outdoor beer garden in Astoria, Queens. 2919 24th Ave Astoria, NY 11102

    Museums

    - MoMA – Modern art museum, really great collection. 11 West 53 Street (between 5th and 6th Avenues)

    - Guggenheim – A bunch of these museums are right on Central Park, so it makes for a great day walking around the park and checking them out. The Guggenheim is right on the east side of Central Park around 90th Street.

    - Museum of Natural History – West side of Central Park around 80th Street

    - Metropolitan Museum of Art – East side of Central Park at 82nd Street

    - MoMA PS1 – If you like the MoMA I’d definitely check out PS1 as well. It’s a modern art museum set in the first NYC public school. Has a great lunch place called M. Wells Dinette in it (mentioned below). 22-25 Jackson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101

    NYC Food

    - Pizza:

    o Lombardi’s – First pizzeria in America. In the Nolita (stands for north of Little Italy) neighborhood in Manhattan. There are a lot of tourist traps in Little Italy, but a walk down Mulberry St is still pretty cool. 32 Spring St, New York, NY

    o John's of Bleecker Street - Classic NYC brick oven pizza. Lots of bars and things to do in the Greenwich Village area (more detail in the 'Neighborhoods' section below.) 278 Bleecker St, New York, NY 10014

    o Grimaldi’s – Might be up to an hour line depending on when you go, but very worth it! One of the best in the city, right under the Brooklyn Bridge. 1 Front St, Brooklyn, NY 11201

    o Totonno’s – Way far out of the way in Coney Island – but if you wander out that way, this place has exceptional pizza.

    o Di Fara – Also a bit of a trek out to Midwood, and a wait for the pies, but this one is my personal favorite. Get the square pie (if they still have any). 1424 Avenue J, New York, NY 11230

    o Roberta’s – In the Bushwick area of Brooklyn, an up and coming neighborhood. They also do amazing Italian food in addition to some of the best pizzas. 261 Moore St Brooklyn, NY

    - Bagels/Delis:

    o Murray’s Bagels – Close to Union Square in the village, nice area to grab a bagel and walk around on a weekend morning. 500 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY

    o Ess-A-Bagel – Excellent bagels and spreads. Voted some of the best bagels in the city. 831 3rd Ave, New York, NY

    o Katz’s Deli – Amazing pastrami and corned beef, very traditional old NY style deli. Open late too so go here after going to a show on the Lower East Side (great venues in that neighborhood). 205 E Houston St, New York, NY

    - Markets:

    o Smorgasburg – Basically a flea market of food – all of the best food trucks and vendors in the city selling their product in one place. Amazing place to get a few small things for lunch. In the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, only open 11-6 on Saturdays. East River State Park (90 Kent Ave at N. 7 St.)

    o Greenmarket in Union Square – Best produce in the city, all from local farms. Open on Saturdays, right in Union Square.

    - Barbeque:

    o Mighty Quinn’s – NYC has some great barbeque spots, Mighty Quinn’s is one of the best. 103 2nd Ave, New York, NY

    o John Brown’s – In Long Island City in Queens. Their specialty is burnt ends, which are the crispy, fatty edges of brisket. They sell out of them fairly quick, but if you go right after work they should still have some. Some great beer on tap here, too. 10-43 44th Dr, Long Island City, NY

    o Fette Sau – Set in a garage in Williamsburg, it’s a great spot for barbeque before heading out for a night in Williamsburg.

    - More upscale restaurants:

    o Peter Luger’s – Expensive steaks, but widely known as the best in New York. Place has been around for over 125 years and wins the best steak award every year.

    o Toro – Spanish tapas in the Meatpacking District, one of my favorites. 85 10th Ave, New York, NY 10011

    o Luksus – Craft beer pairings with every course.. incredible. The tasting menu is expensive but so worth it. It's in the Greenpoint area in the back room of Torst, which is my favorite bar in the city. 615 Manhattan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11222

    o ABC Kitchen – One of the hardest restaurants to get a reservation for in the city, but for good reason. Works as a date spot, or for a nice dinner if your family is visiting. 35 E 18th St, New York, NY

    o M. Wells Dinette – This place is in the Moma PS1 Museum in Queens, so it’s good for a lunch after checking out the museum. Some of the most inventive food in the city – menu changes pretty much every day. MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101

    Cool Neighborhoods

    - Greenpoint/North Williamsburg in Brooklyn

    o Brooklyn Bowl – A bowling alley where they serve a large variety of Brooklyn beers, and sometimes have gigs as well

    o Torst – Amazing craft beer bar in Greenpoint, my personal favorite in the city

    o Brooklyn Night Bazaar – A nighttime market on the weekends where they have shows, games, food vendors, a bit of everything

    - Greenwich Village

    o Washington Square Park – Cool park near NYU

    o Bleecker Street – Lots of bars, places to eat. Makes for a great night out.

    o Generation Records – One of the best vinyl stores in NY, great collection

    o Irving Plaza and Webster Hall – Great places to see a show

    o Proletariat - Great craft beer bar. Also near St. Marks Place, which is also a cool place to check out.

    - Lower East Side

    o Lots of cool bars here, can also walk across the Williamsburg Bridge to Williamsburg

    o Cake Shop, ABC No Rio, Pianos, Bowery Ballroom – Some of my favorite places to see a show in NYC, all on the Lower East Side.

    o The Whiskey Ward – If you like whiskey, this place has a great selection[/collapse]
     
    Last edited by moderator Bob Richards: Dec 15, 2017
  2. Brooklyn Ranger

    Brooklyn Ranger Registered User

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    The amazing thing about the NYC subway is not how bad it is, but how well it actually works. The City wouldn't exist without it.

    And I challenge any other system to work as well running 24/7 for over a hundred years.
     
  3. Megustaelhockey

    Megustaelhockey Blue and pointy

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    I'd support closing it for 3-4 hours per night if it means getting it even a little bit cleaner, especially the track bed.
     
  4. Brooklyn Ranger

    Brooklyn Ranger Registered User

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    The trade-off is too great: too many people depend on the subway running all night.

    And the whole city has gotten dirtier again. It's not just the subway.
     
  5. Chytil

    Chytil I like Andersson too Sponsor

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    Is the fact that it's never really been updated really something to be proud of though?
     
  6. PlamsUnlimited

    PlamsUnlimited G R O T O N S

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    It's less about the updating and more how it keeps going. They put off a lot of renovating though that there's so much old tech that things are crapping out all at once. And with ConEd doing work it apparently also shorted things out lately. But I would be dead in the water without it at all times.

    I'm a train nerd/geek so if y'all have questions about them let me know :laugh:

    If you guys want to see some anomalies they're taking R143 half length trains from the L and using cameras and sensors between cars around sharp curves on the 8th avenue line and around Coney Island yard for the proposed new R211's design. The R32 fleet is to be retired at the end of 2017 supposedly too. Something incredibly impressive is that we keep these things in running condition that are into the 50s and near 60s. They are living history. The R32 outlasted the R40, which was younger than the R32.

    For anyone that takes the crosstown the R68 and R68A trains on there are getting refurbishments and new PA/LED systems. :D

    And of course, they're closing down one side of at least 53rd street on 4th avenue in Brooklyn to do renovations and plan to continue that progress with most stations. Also, the N/W service in Queens is going to be disrupted for some weekends. So plan accordingly for that.

    I really should work for the MTA.

    You can still see platforms from the old trolley systems in some J line stations... The old 42nd street platform was cut in half when they extended the 7 to Hudson Yards, and did you guys know the Broadway line is the deepest system below the ground on average?! The IRT (1-7) actually get more maintenance than the IND/BMT (letters) and the people working the IND/BMT actually have to manually run switches and such more. Debating on whether or not I should scare all of you away with more useful and useless MTA info.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2017
  7. The Gloaming

    The Gloaming Free Jesper Fast

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    Isn't there a roof leak in our new 4 billion dollar MTA station?

    Yesterday while waiting for an A or C Train, there were four E trains in a row that came through first. Four! Why? Why is this the only train system in the developed world that's not expected to be on any kind of schedule?

    In Moscow trains come every 30 seconds and that's it. No delays, no closing and opening the doors eight times before the train can leave. And it obviously doesn't smell like **** and exhaust. Oh, and they somehow go days and weeks and years without these mysterious "signal malfunctions" that plague our system.

    The whole city getting dirtier recently is true as well. Probably due in part to neverending construction and repair projects.
     
  8. PlamsUnlimited

    PlamsUnlimited G R O T O N S

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    Power outages/people holding the door cause people and delays mostly. The MTA is supposed to be getting more money from the governor's office to do work. The signals and a lot of the detection hardware is pretty old.

    It's hard to completely fix a system over 100 years old quickly if they aren't getting sufficient funding unfortunately. Our system is too massive. Projects always arise
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2017
  9. The Gloaming

    The Gloaming Free Jesper Fast

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    They get plenty of funding. The problem is the overbloated salaries and contracts - especially contracts. They give favors to their buddies in the contracting biz, and next thing you know, they're spending triple over what they should be.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/03/...n-station-at-the-world-trade-center.html?_r=0

    Spending nearly half a billion dollars on Italian-made steel? I'm sorry, I thought we produce plenty of steel in America. Among other idiotic moves. In this case, most of it was federal money because it's the 9/11 site, but this is par for the course for how the MTA usually operates.

    Maybe instead of building useless leaking roofs, they should spend that money to fix their signaling systems, lay new tracks - and, GASP! - Put rubber tires on the wheels. I've used many subway systems throughout the world, and all of them are ten times quieter because other countries know that having metal against metal will create a very unpleasant high-pitched sound.

    NY'ers love to spout the 24/7 narrative, but I'd rather a system that closes for 3-4 hours a night and is then able to follow an actual schedule during normal waking hours.
     
  10. PlamsUnlimited

    PlamsUnlimited G R O T O N S

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    It won't happen. The closest we will see is modified late night service.

    They have been putting new rails ballast and ties down. It's an extremely drawn out process on regular railroads and even more so in tunnels where it's a pain in the ass to get continuous welded rails into small spaces. These CWRs are better so they are coming but it still a pain to fully replace the jointed ones with. There usually is not a need for entire new sections of track unless a rail breaks/warps or spikes are loose, etc.

    There's a thing called LORAM and what it does is grinds the rails to make them fine again, which results in less noise, smoother rail riding and improves the lifespan of the rails. Most of the ties are concrete except pockets of treated wood still. The main problem with the actual track is where some older interlocks and switches are because of old parts and water damage recently. If/when you see red flags and such sticking up that is usually signs of working on improving switches/ better signal automation.

    As for rubberized wheels it probably won't happen as the stock the subway here uses is a lot bigger and heavier than most other systems. In most cases the rubber wheels need special track and the gauging is a little bit different... but that usually depends on the country and is pretty irregular. So imagine having to explain to riders you're tearing up lines and putting down entire new specifications of track for rubber wheels. Not good. An R160 is 85,200 pounds. The newest stock in the Metro in Montreal is not even 55,000. Not a be-all end all but that is part of it. The biggest reason is because steel rail-steel wheel reduces friction the most which saves energy

    The R188 and new R179 models are quieter. The insulation seals on them are a lot better, which will cut down on the noise from inside but again, our trains are pretty much hulking giants of steel so it'll still be a little noisy at best.

    As for the dirty factor yeah that needs to be fixed. VAKTRAK is not that efficient
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2017
  11. GordonGecko

    GordonGecko Custom User Title

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    The subways right now are borderline unrideable. It's a disaster - between deblasio letting all the homeless pee/vomit up and down the trains and breakdowns w/ signal malfunctions and overcrowding worse than sardine cans under a metalsheet press, it's almost better to drive everywhere even with the gridlock
     
  12. PlamsUnlimited

    PlamsUnlimited G R O T O N S

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    Passenger rail in this country as a whole is pretty much a cluster**** though unless you fully expect and know what you're dealing with before you do it. Freight rail is operated so much more efficiently.
     
  13. Synergy27

    Synergy27 I only like it when it's dimed out.

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    Have any of you all been following the DC Metro debacle at all? For all its warts, the NYC Subway really is fantastic.

    That said, I will happily take my 7 mile, 20 minute car commute over any sort of public transit option everything single time.
     
  14. Crease

    Crease Chief Justice of the HFNYR Court

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    NYC Subway may be fantastic relative to other US metro systems, but it is far less clean and efficient than many many international metro systems. I get that the MTA workers deserve a ton of credit for keeping a 100 year old system running 24/7 but I think the MTA is taking a short-sighted approach needing reconsideration.
     
  15. Chief Ranger

    Chief Ranger Try Not To Suck

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    It doesn't even come close to competing with the subway systems in major international cities. The NY subway system needs a serious face lift at some point in the near future.
     
  16. GordonGecko

    GordonGecko Custom User Title

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    I don't care if it's ugly, just give me a hole in the ground and a clean train that works properly and doesn't stall out. Is that too much to ask? The reason it takes 1.5 billion to build one new station is because they try to make it all nice and overbuild with nonessential features
     
  17. JRinNYC

    JRinNYC Registered User Sponsor

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    Yeah, I can't believe how backwards the US is when it comes to high speed rail. It upsets me as an American that it takes 11 hours to travel from NYC to Montreal by train, yet it takes only 6 hours by car. NYC to Montreal, QC, CA is 332 miles (as the crow flies). Madrid, Spain to Barcelona, Spain is 314 miles and you can take their high speed train, the RENFE AVE in about 3 hours. The Amtrak Acela, which is listed as high speed rail, from NYC to Washington, D.C. which is 204 miles is 3 hours. You only save 30 minutes compared to the Northeast Regional.
    The Acela reaches top speeds of about 150 mph, while the RENFE AVE reaches about 190 mph. The Acela does not count as high speed.

    Also pricing on the Acela is too expensive. The cheapest NYC to DC one way ticket is $124.00. The cheapest RENFE AVE train ticket from Madrid to Barcelona is €58.15 (about $63).

    :cry:
     
  18. PlamsUnlimited

    PlamsUnlimited G R O T O N S

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    Yeah it's cause those places care about their rail transit and we don't give it enough love here, IMO. I use Empire Service from Buffalo to Penn and it takes about the same amount of time as a drive, all things considered.
     
  19. The Gloaming

    The Gloaming Free Jesper Fast

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    The car industry, especially GM lobbied (bribed) Congress back in the 50s to cut any potential passenger rail projects they may have had. So you can thank them for our horrendous passenger trains.
     
  20. Crease

    Crease Chief Justice of the HFNYR Court

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    That's interesting even if unsurprising.
     
  21. PlamsUnlimited

    PlamsUnlimited G R O T O N S

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    I didn't know when it happened(and I wasn't alive then) but I really wish that rail travel here was more prominent. It really is a great travel method and if kept up to par blows driving out of the water.
     
  22. JRinNYC

    JRinNYC Registered User Sponsor

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    Yeah, it's sad. :shakehead I fantasize of the day of taking high speed rail and being in Montreal in 3 hours, Boston or DC in 2 hours or Philly in an hour to catch a NYR game there and then coming home the same day. Can you imagine the awesome hockey rail trips. I think some of those arenas would implement what NSH is doing. Not allowing people from outside their local area to buy tickets, because Rangers fan would take over. :laugh:
     
  23. PlamsUnlimited

    PlamsUnlimited G R O T O N S

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    What's even funny and embarrassing to me is that the Acela tops out at about 160 and the P40/42 Diesel engines on my train go almost 120 MPH in some spots. :laugh:
     
  24. JRinNYC

    JRinNYC Registered User Sponsor

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    Like I said, I really don't count Acela as high speed rail. It's like putting a Toyota Corolla engine in a Ferrari chassis. Sure it looks fast, but really it's not.
     
  25. JRinNYC

    JRinNYC Registered User Sponsor

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    Don't get me started with the maglev technology out in Asia. Holy smoke, that's some impressive speeds! Speeds of 350+ mph!!! That's just unreal.
     

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