How to break in skates?

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by Daryl, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. Daryl

    Daryl Registered User

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    787
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hey,

    I have a fee questions regarding skates,1) Which ones are the best?(generally speaking).
    2)How do I "break" them in?
    3)How long will it take?

    Just a few facts about me that may help you answer my questions,I'm size 9 but 10 fits too.
     
  2. kr580

    kr580 Who knows.

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,373
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    California
    1. Any of the current brands are pretty good. Bauer, Reebok and CCM seem to be the most popular. Easton skates have a reputation for falling apart quickly. I wouldn't bother with the bottom of the line skates from any brand (under $120 or so). The quality starts 2 or 3 lines up for each brand.

    2. Skate in them. Baking at the shop when you buy them helps shorten the process slightly.

    3. I would imagine it depends on how well the skate fits your feet in the first place. My Bauer Supremes were as good as they're going to get in maybe a week (couple games, couple public skates) since they fit like a glove out of the box.
     
  3. blokeyhighlander

    blokeyhighlander June = :cupnana:

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Messages:
    2,133
    Likes Received:
    51
    Trophy Points:
    71
    Location:
    NC
    There is a dedicated skates thread but I'll bite.

    1) It's really subjective. Different brands and models cater to different foot types. Do you know your foot profile (foot width/heel size)? I knew my foot profile and did an online purchase based on information I gathered and it worked fine. However, most people will need to try out skates to see what's best for their foot. Unless you're advanced you don't need the "latest and greatest".

    2) Skating in them for awhile or baking them. There are plenty of threads on baking and if your skates can be baked the information should come with your new skates. It's probably best done by a professional if it's your first time.

    3) Depends on how well your skates fit initially. Tight skates will take some time to break-in but skates that are too loose will always be too loose.
     
  4. nullterm

    nullterm Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Messages:
    2,559
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    iPhone game developer
    Location:
    Port Moody, BC
    Not really the answer you specifically asked for, but go to your local hockey shop, get fitted, try on a few different ones in your price range, choose the one that fits best, get them baked at the store so the mold to your feet.

    I just picked up a new pair of Reebok 6K's today and can't wait. Much better fit than my CCM Vector 4.0's.

    I originally went in with the full intent of getting a pair of Bauer Supreme One70's, but the Reebok's fit my feet way better.

    So,

    1) The best skates are the one that fit your feet the best. No one can answer that but you by trying a bunch out to compare.

    2) Get them baked at the hockey shop, then just skate in them to finish breaking them in.

    3) Depends on the skate, but 3/4 times skating in them?
     
  5. kr580

    kr580 Who knows.

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,373
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    California
    This too. Try on as many skates as you can in your price range from all brands to find the best fit. Disregard brand, model or looks. Go with feel.
     
  6. Seanconn*

    Seanconn* Guest

    what everyone else said. tried your best to get the ones that feel like most comfortable while fully tied up at the store. don't worry about wasting the sales person time, feel free to tie everyone up, and try out a variety. If your feet arent growing anymore, try to spend over 150-200, and buy on sale, when ever possible.


    once you have a pair of skates that you're comfortable in, bake them at the sore, take good care of them, and be sure to always loosen the laces as far to the bottom of the laces as possible (so you tighten the bottom laces each time, and get your foot out without putting any strain on the tongue of the skate.

    wipe off your blades after every skate, and wear skate guards whenever possible... you can get away without guards at the ODR most of the time though.

    Be sure to wear a really comfortable pair of tube socks, and get skating! There's nothing much more than you can do, other than be sure you are tightening your skates correctly each time, and untying them correctly.
     
  7. Dump and Chase

    Dump and Chase Hand of God

    Joined:
    May 6, 2010
    Messages:
    635
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Your skate size should be smaller than your shoe size.


    I wear a size 10 shoe but in skates I am a 9.


    When you skate your knees are bent and your ankle is flexed forward. This posture shortens the length of your foot considerably and you should be 1 to 1.5 sizes smaller than the shoes that you wear when you stand straight.
     
  8. canuck44

    canuck44 Registered User

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2010
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    While the 1/1.5 rule works most of the time, it should be noted that it's not always true. I wear size 9 shoes, but wear 6.5 skates.
     
  9. adaminnj

    adaminnj Leafs out = SPRING!

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    Messages:
    682
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    What JOB? HOCKEY!
    Location:
    NJ
    Yeah I wear a 11 EEE shoe but a size 9 EE skate.

    baking and skating is the only way to brake in a skate. Skates are not like a ball glove that you can oil up and toss out in the yard for a week. you wil have to work them :)
     
  10. Jarick

    Jarick Doing Nothing

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2007
    Messages:
    25,259
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    St Paul, MN
    Home Page:
    From what I understand, baking helps the foams and (depending on the skate) the outer materials to conform somewhat to your foot. Usually when you skate on them the first few times you're not actually breaking in the skate so much as your feet adjusting to them. If they aren't comfortable after 4 or 5 skates, you probably need them re-baked, punched, stretched, or they aren't the right skate for your foot, which is why the fitting is vital.
     
  11. mikitas donut

    mikitas donut Flowers of Antimony

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,948
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    54
    Location:
    Northern Illinois
    I have really small skates. I wear a 10.5 running shoe, but my skates are 7.5 EE. They are Bauer Vapor X30s. I had to get them baked twice, but they feel pretty good now.
     
  12. Pierre Gotye

    Pierre Gotye Registered User

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2009
    Messages:
    4,012
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Don't bake your skates unless you feel you really have to.

    Contrary to what is said, I think it tends to weaken their stiffness.

    At any rate, you can always buy plastic skate guards and secure them to the cradle and just wear them around the house.

    As for breaking them in the best way is to continue to skate on them as much as possible.

    I would venture around 40 hours of skating will get them broken in.

    I noticed with my 7k's the break-in period seemed much shorter than with my Bauer Vapors.

    A good skate should fit you well and break-in nicely.
     
  13. Waltah*

    Waltah* Guest

    i just wore my ice skates and inline skates. i didnt heat them or anything. took a good 4 or 5 sessions for them to start feeling good though.
     
  14. Daryl

    Daryl Registered User

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    787
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the help guys.

    Anyone recommendations on which skates are good? Around the 100-150 price range good for a first year player..
     
  15. nullterm

    nullterm Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Messages:
    2,559
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    iPhone game developer
    Location:
    Port Moody, BC
    Might be a touch higher than your range by $30-$50, and I've only skated in them once so far, but I'm really liking my Reebok 6Ks. I'd suggest trying on a pair to compare against whatever else might work.

    Also try out Bauer Supreme and Vapors.
     
  16. kr580

    kr580 Who knows.

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,373
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    California
    Again, whatever fits your foot. Bauer, Reebok, CCM or Easton will all do you good. Just try everything on you can and go with what fits. We could give a whole list of skates but if none of them fit your foot well it won't help you much. :P
     

Share This Page

monitoring_string = "358c248ada348a047a4b9bb27a146148"