Can we consider Stan Mikita as a Slovak player?

Discussion in 'The History of Hockey' started by alko, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. alko

    alko Registered User

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    4,754
    Likes Received:
    352
    Trophy Points:
    124
    Location:
    Slovakia
    Home Page:
    As a little boy he moved to North America and He never played for Czechoslovakia or Slovakia.

    But in many periodics here in Slovakia is he considered as Slovak player. So, im a little bit confused, because then it should be Peter Bondra considered as Ukrainer...
     
  2. Reds4Life

    Reds4Life Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,795
    Likes Received:
    65
    Trophy Points:
    101
    Location:
    the Czech republic
    The difference is that Bondra actually played for Slovakia. Mikita is a Canadian born in (Czecho)Slovakia.
     
  3. Derick*

    Derick* Guest

    Is Slovakia going to split up into Slo Republic and Vakia?
     
  4. Franck

    Franck eltiT resU motsuC

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    9,525
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Occupation:
    Bank robber
    Location:
    Gothenburg
    He's about as Slovakian as Bob Nystrom is Swedish.

    The HHoF might go by place of birth, but I have a hard time considering anyone who has received his entire hockey "education" in Canada as a Slovak or Swedish hockey player, particularly not if they did not play for those national teams.
     
  5. Washington Capitals

    Washington Capitals Stanley Cup champs

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    10,327
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    oracle developer
    No. He grew up in Canada.
     
  6. Eisen

    Eisen Registered User

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    Messages:
    12,356
    Likes Received:
    646
    Trophy Points:
    139
    Location:
    Duesseldorf
    Dunno, if he considers himself Slovak, then yes. If not, then no.
     
  7. Psycho Papa Joe

    Psycho Papa Joe Porkchop Hoser

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    23,347
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Forensic Accountant
    Location:
    Cesspool, Ontario
    Home Page:
    From a hockey perspective, he's a Canadian hockey player. His entire hockey education came in Canada. That said, there is absolutely no problem with Slovaks saying he is their first great hockey superstar.

    From a citizenship perspective, I'm sure he's eligible for dual citizenship.
     
  8. Chumley

    Chumley Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2010
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria, B.C.
    100% Canadian in the way he played and how he carried himself. Class act.
     
  9. jkrx

    jkrx Registered User

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,337
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You mean that if he played like a slovakian he wouldn't be a class act?
     
  10. Psycho Papa Joe

    Psycho Papa Joe Porkchop Hoser

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    23,347
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Forensic Accountant
    Location:
    Cesspool, Ontario
    Home Page:
    I guess Bobby Clarke grew up and learned how to play hockey in Slovakia:laugh:
     
  11. JackSlater

    JackSlater Registered User

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    Messages:
    9,183
    Likes Received:
    1,387
    Trophy Points:
    109
    Mikita learned to play hockey in Canada, and because of that he is a product of Canadian hockey. When it comes to which country a player is from in the hockey sense this is by far the biggest factor to me.
     
  12. Stephen

    Stephen Registered User

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2002
    Messages:
    45,690
    Likes Received:
    2,244
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Home Page:
    As a Canadian, I get pretty tired of this self congratulatory nonsense, as if Canada invented humility and dignity.

    Anyway, having played for Team Canada, he's pretty Canadian, though the Slovaks obviously have a right to be proud of him too.
     
  13. Prince Pasta

    Prince Pasta Donnie needs to deal

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2006
    Messages:
    2,853
    Likes Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Milford, NH
    would that not make heatley german? regher brazilian? kolzig south african
     
  14. MadArcand

    MadArcand Whaletarded

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    5,463
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Seat of the Empire
    How so? Being born by accident in Brazil to Canadians and living whole life in Canada doesn't make Regehr Brazilian in any way, shape or form. It's quite different from being born in Slovakia to Slovak parents and living there a substantial part of Mikita's childhood.
     
  15. pirate94

    pirate94 Registered User

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2010
    Messages:
    1,713
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    didn't Mikita play for Team Canada?
     
  16. gifted88

    gifted88 Dante the poet

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Messages:
    7,060
    Likes Received:
    41
    Trophy Points:
    71
    Occupation:
    Aerospace
    Location:
    Guelph, ON
    Well, are there any quotes or interviews with him mentioning anything about that?

    I consider him Slovak even though he played for team Canada. It's not like I consider Hull American cause he played for the US.

    Edit: He is a Canadian citizen, Wiki says he is a Slovak born Canadian. So that sums it up, he's Canadian.
    http://icehockey.wikia.com/wiki/Stan_Mikita
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2011
  17. Big Phil

    Big Phil Registered User

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2003
    Messages:
    26,349
    Likes Received:
    510
    Trophy Points:
    229
    Well it only took 15 posts for someone to remember that. Yes he did play in the 1972 Summit Series..........for Canada.

    Let's look at it this way, we all know he was born in Slovakia but raised in Canada. Was it 4 years old or so that he came over? I can't remember.

    But in all fairness, he was born in 1940. Would he have learned the game of hockey at an elite level that would have propelled him to Hall of Fame status had he stayed in Slovakia? Almost certainly not, especially at that time. So you have to credit Canada for that.

    Besides, there has yet to be a Slovakian player inducted into the HHOF. Palffy and Bondra won't make it. Some people make a case for Hossa eventually. Demitra has no shot. Only Chara will get in for sure out of that bunch. So here we are in 2011 and it'll take until 2020 (prediction) before a Slovak gets into the HHOF. I'm pretty sure Stan knows where he learned this game.
     
  18. jcbio11

    jcbio11 Registered User

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Messages:
    2,353
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Location:
    Bratislava
    Absolutely not. Newspapers are full of it. Plus they usually say Slovak born, not Slovakian hockey player.

    Mikita - Canadien hockey player
    Bondra - Slovakian hockey player

    What matter is where they were trained, not born. Bondra moved to Slovakia when he was 3, his father was Slovakian. He learned to play here, grew up here.

    Mikita moved to Canada when he was 8. He might have been born to Slovakian parents and in Slovakia, but he was completely Canadien trained in hockey. Thus he is a Canadien hockey player.

    Don't put too much stock into who played for which national team though. Remember Stastny played for Canada as well, but he's Slovak through and through. Played for Slovakia afterwards as well.
     
  19. Theokritos

    Theokritos Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2010
    Messages:
    8,433
    Likes Received:
    720
    Trophy Points:
    109
    I think it depends. Šťastný played in Czechoslovakia and for Czechoslovakia before he played for Team Canada in 1984: he's a Czechoslovakian resp. Slovakian hockey player, never mind the 84 Canada Cup. Bryan Trottier: played for Team Canada in 1981, but for Team USA in 1984 - he's Canadian, period. But then you have guys like Olaf Kölzig: Born to German parents in South Africa, moved to Canada at 3 years of age, grew up in Canada, learned to play hockey in Canada - now, would he have played for Canada in the World Junior Championships or in the World Championships before he decided to join Team Germany in 1996/1997, he wouldn't be considered a German hockey player at all. He's actually a Canadian hockey player and the only thing German about him is the fact that played for Team Germany. So there are cases where the national team matters.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2017
  20. matnor

    matnor Registered User

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2009
    Messages:
    512
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    34
    Location:
    Boston
    As has been mentioned, Stastny is from Slovakia.
     
  21. Hacker10

    Hacker10 Registered User

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2010
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Horrible lookin'!
    What "we" think dosen't matter.

    What is his take on the subject? That's what counts.
     
  22. jekoh

    jekoh Registered User

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Messages:
    4,416
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Actually, it does (at least according to this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazilian_nationality_law )
     
  23. gifted88

    gifted88 Dante the poet

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Messages:
    7,060
    Likes Received:
    41
    Trophy Points:
    71
    Occupation:
    Aerospace
    Location:
    Guelph, ON
    He's a Slovak born Canadian, end of story. How is this so hard to figure out? He's a Canadian citizen, so that makes him a Canadian.
     
  24. MadArcand

    MadArcand Whaletarded

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    5,463
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Seat of the Empire
    Citizenship doesn't really define you as anything, it's just a paper. Stastny isn't Canadian if he's Canadian citizen.

    Mikita is Slovak and Canadian both. As a player however, he's just Canadian.
     
  25. unknown33

    unknown33 Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    Messages:
    3,848
    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    71
    Location:
    Europe
    The only way to find this out is to ask Stan Mikita if he considers himself Canadian or Slovakian.
     

Share This Page

monitoring_string = "358c248ada348a047a4b9bb27a146148"