Breakout strategies

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by SeenSchenn2, May 27, 2011.

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  1. SeenSchenn2

    SeenSchenn2 Itchin' For Mitch

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    Hey guys,

    My beer-league team seems to be running around alot in our end and we usually just clear the puck because of the lack of support/available passes.

    Anybody got some simple breakout strategies that you think we could implement? I know this is very vague, but if more info is needed, just ask. :)

    Thanks!
     
  2. ATLhockey437

    ATLhockey437 Registered User

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    -D1 behind the net, he passes to his D-2 partner whose on or just ahead the goal line

    -D2 skates up and holding onto the puck. While this is going on, have the strong side wing and center be in passing lanes in this strong side. This should get players on the other team to commit to the strong side in that they are expecting your D partner to dish it to one of those 2 teammates.

    -By the time this happens, the D2 with the puck should be near or just beyond the hashmarks.

    -He passes it back to D1 who is almost parallel (slighty behind but in the middle of his own d-zone). D1 will have time to find the 3rd winger who should be on the red line on the weak side of the ice. D1 makes a zip/slap pass that can be redirected in as a dump if the winger is not behind the red line obviously. Or if he has the space, he should be able to carry it in taking it wide.
     
  3. nullterm

    nullterm Registered User

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    D gets puck behind net.

    W nearest D goes to boards near face off circle, receives puck.

    C curls up from in front of crease near W, carrying puck up & out.

    W on far side of C, offering a pass option.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. budster

    budster Schoolyard Puck

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    Here's a basic breakout strategy you could use. I think it's important to keep it very simple at first or your team can get overwhelmed. The advice that helped my team was to tell the wingers to keep their butts against the boards, and the center to offer puck support. Then follow your pass. It seemed to work pretty well.

    I think sometimes players think a breakout means all the forwards bolt to the attacking zone and leave the D to make a long bomb pass. As you know, this isn't very effective!
     
  5. noobman

    noobman Registered User

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    As a defenseman there's nothing more frustrating than picking up the puck and finding that your three forwards are all standing still at the opponent's blueline. The easiest breakout is to have either winger anchor themselves on the boards between the hash marks and the blueline in your own zone. They retrieve the puck and pass it to the centre or other winger, both of whom have started streaking up the ice after seeing the initial pass from the defenseman.
     
  6. iBlaze81

    iBlaze81 Registered User

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    format: D behind the net with puck, the other D at the corner for support if the the other team is fore-checking hard, LW and RW around the half wall in your zone, and C in the slot.

    D passes to LW or RW, then LW or RW pass to C who skating up the middle before he hits your blueline, short passes is the key to this breakout, the longer the pass, the easier it is to get picked off, before the 3rd pass to the C, he must be curling back to generate speed when he has the puck, now that the C has the puck he can either skate into the neutral zone or pass off the other Winger.

    If the forecheck is too hard after the first pass, have winger pass it back to D and reset.
     
  7. trtaylor

    trtaylor Registered User

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    This video describes basic breakout technique.

     
  8. Pez68

    Pez68 Registered User

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    In beer leagues, the biggest problem with breakouts tends to be forwards not staying in the defensive zone. Make sure your wingers "stay home" when you get possession. The winger on the side the puck is on, should be on the boards near the faceoff circle, waiting for a pass. The center should ALWAYS be down supporting the defense and assisting on the breakout. Far side winger can jump the zone without too much risk, typically.

    Basics. Just stick to basics. You actually have the solution to your problem, right in your post. You said your team is running around a lot. Not going to breakout when you're all running around. Stick to position. Stop running around. Rest will take care of itself.
     
  9. Headcoach

    Headcoach Registered User

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    First, always exit the defensive zone towards the weak side, not the strong side. Ok, what's the difference? The strong side is where the puck is and the weak side is where the puck is not. Generally, on the strong side, everyone in the ice will be on that side hoping to keep the puck from exiting the zone. So how many are on the weak side, NONE...get it! Ok...maybe one!

    Ok, look at this picture below
    [​IMG]

    You will see the defenseman going behind the net towards the weak side where the winger comes down away fron the point position to assist in the break out. Have the center circle towards that winger set up on the boards. This allows the center to have a bigger arc in this cross over which will allow him more speed in the break out.

    That means that the winger will have to make room for the on coming center. Have the winger come away from the boards into the center's skating lane. This move should happen when the center gets to the bottom of the face off circle.

    However, the key to a successful breakout if the off wing. Why? Have that off winger over load the zone just infront on the near defenseman. The move will inform the defenseman that they are on the move and he will move off the Bluline and into the neutral zone, thus, allowing for a smoother breakout. By have this off winger over load the zone, this give that defenseman now three passing option for the brakeout.

    Hope this helps.
    Head coach
     
  10. RangersAM99

    RangersAM99 Registered User

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    when in doubt, glass an out.
     
  11. nullterm

    nullterm Registered User

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    This too.

    If I had a dime for the number of times I've gone behind the net to get the puck, look up and see the rest of the team waiting at the far blue line, well behind a wall of the other team waiting in the defensive and neutral zones.
     
  12. SeenSchenn2

    SeenSchenn2 Itchin' For Mitch

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    Thanks for the all the tips guys...

    From reading what most of you are saying, it's more of just our team staying in the zone :laugh:. Much easier to execute when the wingers are at the half-wall, or even the boards.
     
  13. TheOtter

    TheOtter Registered User

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    Another thing I find at lower levels of rec hockey is trying to clear it along the boards all the way from below the goal line. All that does is make it more likely to get past your teammates and right to their point man, who's waiting there watching it come the whole way.

    If you send it along the boards, do it so it has just enough speed to get through the corner, so your center or winger has a chance to go pick it up before it gets all the way to the point.
     
  14. Trojan35

    Trojan35 Registered User

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    Adding to this... nothing annoys your winger more than a D-man having all day to make a pass, and settling for rimming it around the glass at the winger's waist/head. A good breakout starts with the first pass, and passes go to people's tape.

    If you run a breakout, rimming it along the boards delays the entire breakout by several seconds (slows the puck down, puck has to travel farther, and causes the winger to have to dig it out)... several seconds is pretty huge when you've got a forechecker running you down and you're stationary at the half-boards. Use the net to create some space and put it on a teammate's tape.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2011

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