Becoming a good goal scorer?

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by YNWA14, Jan 19, 2011.

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  1. YNWA14

    YNWA14 You'll Never Walk Alone

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    I know there are certain things that just come over time, like knowing where to be and when to be there. Hockey sense. Etc.

    But are there specific things that you can work on off the ice, or on it without being in a team situation that can make you better at scoring goals? Any kind of practice or drill would be appreciated (even something as simple as box drills to increase skating speed.)
     
  2. The Devil In I

    The Devil In I Registered User

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    I like to show up about 30 mins before open hockey starts and just work on my shot. I focus a lot on disguising the release, like shooting mid-stride. A quick, accurate wrist shot is probably the most important thing to become a better scorer. Working out off ice just to get in better shape and get yourself quicker obviously wouldn't hurt either. Sprints work.
     
  3. nesford2457

    nesford2457 Registered User

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    Speed and conditioning will obviusly help you in all areas of your game not just goal scoring. If your looking for something to help with putting the puck in the net I would say try two things. First i you can off ice with a net and a shooting pad try taking shots from off angles where normally it would considered a low percentage shot get it to where you can pick the corners it will catch goalies by surprise when you take these shots in the game. Second get in real close to the net put some pads or something down to simulate a goalie laying on there side and practice roofing the puck. You will start to find in games if your doing the right thing by crashing the net the need to get the puck up in a hurry will help with scoring.
     
  4. Jarick

    Jarick Doing Nothing

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    I'm finally hitting a point now where I'm scoring goals very regularly in league. What I found makes the biggest difference is getting the puck into high scoring areas and having a very quick release on your shot.

    My first year, I lost the puck a lot trying to dangle because my stick was too long and I was inexperienced. My second year, I improved my stickhandling but my skating wasn't as good, so I wasn't able to get into good scoring areas. My third year, I started to put it together but my shot was kind of weak and slow, plus I played defense.

    This year, I feel confident when I get the puck that I can carry it up ice with speed, get into a good scoring area, and I changed my shot over the summer so it's got a much quicker release to it by using no-windup snapshots instead of big wrist shots. I don't even aim, I just fire it at the net. Subconsciously, I'm trying to pick corners or find open net, but mostly just quick release.

    You really need to work on all aspects of the game, but one of the last things that will happen is your brain to really "slow it down" and get yourself into scoring areas. But to get there, you have to work on your skating (both speed and agility), your puck control, your vision (head up), and your strength. And once you're there, you need a quick shot.
     
  5. Dump and Chase

    Dump and Chase Hand of God

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    #1

    Shoot and Shoot and Shoot.

    Shoot pucks until it becomes second nature and you don't have to think about it. Practice getting more power, practice quick release, practice getting shots off from difficult spots. And always practice accuracy. I am always trying to ring every shot off the inside of a post or crossbar.


    #2

    Think about your common situations.

    Where do you get the most opportunities for getting shots off? Are you a fast winger who can shoot 3 or 4 times a game after creating some space on the outside of the d? Do you walk out of the corner often after winning a fore check? Do you get a lots of breakaways?


    Once you recognize these spots come up with a game plan of what you are going to create and practice it. For example, as a right handed center I get lots of opportunities where I move to open ice on the left wing, get the puck and then cut back parallel to the blue line to the slot. I try and wait for the goalie to move off of his post and as soon as he starts to track me off I shoot a quick release to the side of the net he just left. The goalies momentum make it difficult to get back in front of this shot.


    #3

    If you don't shoot you can't score.

    Throw lots of puck at the net. As many as you can. If you throw enough **** at a wall some of if will stick.


    #4

    Go to the net.

    When you don't have the puck in the offensive zone and one of your team mates is going to shoot, go to the net. And stop. And stay there for rebounds. Don't cruise through the area and keep going to the corner or behind the net. Stay there, get body position on the D and fight for those rebound. You can score a bucket load of ugly goals from right there.



    Just a few ideas to get you started. Goal scorers are not born, they are made. They recognize opportunities, think deeper, and practice harder than the rest.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2011
  6. Devil Dancer

    Devil Dancer Registered User Sponsor

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    Find a way to shoot off the ice, and do it all the time. I practice shooting against a wall on rollerblades with regular ice pucks. Some people swear by the shooting pads.

    What made a bigger difference for me though was playing on a team in which I'm one of the best players. That forced me to be a little more greedy than I used to be, and to rely on myself more. Now I'm much more balanced in terms of passing and shooting, whereas I used to be a pass first guy.
     
  7. canuck44

    canuck44 Registered User

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    One thing I've always been told and pass onto others who listen, LOOK BEFORE YOU SHOOT. It's a very simple piece of advice, but it's a very common piece of mistake that almost all beginners and even some mid-range players make. If you don't look at the bloody net before you shoot, you have no idea what's open. Of course this is only useful if you have enough accuracy to place the puck where you want it.

    And what others have said about shooting the puck. I've noticed a lot of low to mid range players won't shoot the puck unless they're in close and feel like they're gonna score. I think it has something to do with the fact that they don't really recognize if there's a man in front of the net, which brings me to the point of go to the net.
     
  8. Steelhead16

    Steelhead16 Registered User

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    Don't get caught up in thinking that the closer you are to the net the better chance you have to score. Stay up in the high slot and work on having a quick release. Keep your body in a position to be able to receive the pass and shoot without having to turn your body and waste time. Staying in the high slot will allow you to keep your stick free and away from defenders. Also stay on the opposite side of the slot than the puck so that the pass has to make the goalie move side to side.

    When coming in on the break with the puck try and use the defenseman as a screen and let your shot go in stride or "show" pass if you have a teammate and let the shot go off that look. One other big thing that most guys do is shoot and coast and see if it goes in. Shoot and assume it won't go in and charge after your shot for a rebound. Even if there is a defenseman there you will probably surprise them and blow right by because they are used to the coasters. And let your shot go early enough that there can be a rebound. Don't get in so deep that you get only one shot off on a break. If you have a teammate crashing the net let your shot go low so that can be a rebound for either one of youl If you are in the middle and a teammate is on one side you have a 66% chance of having someone there for a rebound against an out of position or off balance goalie.

    In a nutshell.......Increase your odds to score. You score more goals by using your head than by having a shot that will knock a goalie back into the net.

    Ugly goals count just as much as top shelf wristers.
     
  9. macleod50

    macleod50 Registered User

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    Practice getting your shot off quicker.
     
  10. budster

    budster Schoolyard Puck

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    Most of us forwards imagine these incredible one-on-one shootout style goals so that's what we practice.

    In reality, the majority of your goals will come from deflections, rebounds, or well-placed assists. Focusing on positioning will probably help you more than anything. So the secret to scoring goals? Linemates who put the puck on net and know how to pass. :)
     
  11. EastonBlues22

    EastonBlues22 Administrator

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    Make a habit of watching the goalie you're playing...during warmups, while you sit on the bench, etc.

    Is he a standup or butterfly guy?

    Does he carry his glove high or low? If he carries it high, what sort of situations/moves make him drop it?

    How deep does he typically play in his crease? How well does he plays his angles? Does he adjust angles well when the play moves laterally? How fast does he get across the crease? When he moves across the crease, how does he do it? Which does he leave more open when he moves laterally...the top part of the net, or his 5-hole? Is he better on one side than the other? Does he favor his better side?

    How high does he come out on a breakaway? Does he match speeds/angles well if the shooter changes pace/direction? Does he always bite on the first fake? Is poke-checking in his defensive arsenal?

    How does he try to cover the net when he's down? How well/long does he hold the near post? How does he defend high? How (and how well) does he regain his feet?

    What's his technique when the puck is behind his own net?

    How well does he read plays as the develop? What are his tendencies on an odd-man rush?

    Etc.

    People are creatures of habit (especially amateurs), and every goalie has his flaws...if you study him well, you can decipher, predict, and exploit them.
     
  12. Jarick

    Jarick Doing Nothing

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    I'd say my goals are 70% wrist/snap shots off the rush, 25% from passes, and 5% rebounds/deflections. Mostly because at the lower levels of hockey, players aren't skilled enough to cycle the puck for a great assist or maintain possession long enough to get it back to the point for a shot, which will almost never make it to the net.

    "Going to the net" for me means taking myself completely out of the play and isolating the puck carrier. Instead, what's far more effective, is working the triangle, especially along the boards. The puck carrier often will get pushed to the outside by one defender, and another defender is going to watch me (as the weak side winger) while the center is cutting off any kind of centering pass. So if I'm at the net, I'm useless.

    But if I go behind the net and call for a pass along the boards, the center and defenseman won't want to drop behind the goal line and leave the front of the net wide open, so I can receive the pass and either make another quick pass to my point or try and find my center on a quick pass. Or occasionally I will just skate the puck out turn and try and shelf it from the top of the crease (works surprisingly well).

    Really though, the best goal scorers at lower levels of hockey are the ones who can get themselves into a good scoring position with the puck. In a 1-on-1 situation, most lower rec goalies can only stop the puck maybe 1 out of every 5 times. If you can take 2-3 shots on the rush, you're going to score a goal every other game. Add in other scoring chances from the cycle, odd man rushes, and the odd garbage goal, and you can score a lot more.
     
  13. ChiTownHawks

    ChiTownHawks Registered User

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    I think a huge key in your post here is getting that shot off quick. The easiest shot to learn is the big sweeping wrist shot. Most beginners use this shot the most (I'm guilty of this as well) b/c it is easy and sometimes the only way for a beginner to develop any kind of power on their shot. The problem with this shot is that it gives the D and the goalie a lot of time to set up for it. Those couple of seconds you take to set up a wrist shot gives the D time to get in your shooting lane and the goalie time to react. I did not realize this until I was on the bench and saw it happening to my dmen who were taking wrist shot instead of slappers and the D was blocking them all with ease.

    Since seeing that I have been working on slappers with my dmen and I have been working on improving my snap shot as well. IMO a quick snap shot with less power will score more often than a powerful wrist shot.
     
  14. YNWA14

    YNWA14 You'll Never Walk Alone

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    Thanks for all the tips guys. I figure I'll get an ice/shooting board or whatever for the summer, and this year I'll just practice taking shots on the ice. I'll practice the snap-shot first because like you guys said quick releases are really important. I found a pretty good tutorial on how a snapshot works, and I've been boxing for a few years so I'm pretty good at shifting my weight without needing the huge windup.
     
  15. GLG

    GLG Registered User

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    Visualize... play out the scenario in your head - picture yourself going "shelf" or "5-hole" whatever on the goalie

    Watch... look at the goalie during warm ups, when you're on the bench (like another poster said)

    Practice, Practice, Practice... get yourself a net, targets, a bunch of pucks or balls & start firing

    Don't Squeeze Your Stick... play relaxed, if you get a scoring chance but don't score don't tighten up & get all worried or fustrated, go back to the bench & visualize the goal next time

    Good luck & light it up buddy!

    GLG
     
  16. canuck44

    canuck44 Registered User

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    That fellow over in Washington, what's his name... Ovenchicken or something? He seems to score lots of goals with big loaded wrist shots :D
     
  17. Dump and Chase

    Dump and Chase Hand of God

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    He loads it up fast and releases it quick. Most often while cutting through traffic and forcing lateral movement out of the goooolie. Oh and he does all this at ridiculous speed.


    Pretty easy to emulate for beginners...


    =D
     
  18. Rush22*

    Rush22* Guest

    1. Work on your puck skills while keeping your head up. You cannot see plays developing or open shooting lanes with your head down.

    2. Develop a quick release on your snap shot. The faster and more unpredictable your shot is the harder it is to stop. Obviously to go along with this is accuracy, you cannot score if your shot misses the intended target.

    3. Practice your lateral movement ability in your skating. Getting the goalie to move across his crease and forcing him to play a different angle on the puck will open up net for you to shoot at.

    4. After that the next step is to play relaxed and not worry about scoring. Just skate hard and make the plays that you see. Once scoring gets into your head you start gripping your stick tighter and you will tend to make more mistakes with the puck. Just know some games it will not be your night while others you will get the feeling that no one can stop you.
     
  19. Marotte Marauder

    Marotte Marauder Registered User

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    1. Practice shooting LOW to the corners.

    2. When rushed-always shoot to strong side. Righties shoot to goalies left and vice versa.

    3. When you don't have a clear shot but have time, shoot about ankle high to the far side. You won't score, but a teamate hustling will likely get a juicy rebound. (hopefully this rubs off and you start getting the backdoor rebounds!)

    4. Keep your stick on the ice and free from being tied up around the net.

    5. Anticipate plays and rebounds, so you are there ahead of time or at the right time.

    Good luck!
     
  20. Jarick

    Jarick Doing Nothing

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    Had a fun goal today, coming in on the left side as a left shot I decide to dump the puck on net with a low hard shot to get a rebound, ramped up the goalie's stick and went top corner. We were down 1-0 about halfway through the game and it started a comeback that we ended up winning 5-3.

    Moral of the story: the low, hard shot is a good play to get those rebounds, and sometimes accidents happen :)
     
  21. WithOutPaperss

    WithOutPaperss Made it Look Sexy

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    Most of these have probably been said above me, but some things you can do to improve your goal scoring are:

    -Work on your speed. If you're quick it will give you more opportunities to score and will also make it easier to make plays in general

    -Positioning is pretty important. Something as simple as staying wide on your side of the ice will pay off. If you're playing with the same people regularly then they will always know that you'll be wide and it opens up the ice as well.

    -The of course release, better shot, puckhandling, etc. The obvious things.

    I myself have been a play maker most of my life but the past two years I decided to start using my speed and hands to carry the puck more often, and I've been setting people up just as often, but I'm now also scoring a lot more.
     
  22. Razzmatazz

    Razzmatazz Registered User

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    Work on your defensive game first.

    A goal a game doesn't mean anything if you are a minus player.
     
  23. As someone who played by the advice of the above poster...

    Ignore it, you're not going to the NHL. You'll have a lot more fun if you score goals.
     
  24. Daryl

    Daryl Registered User

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    You could do a few things. Work on your hand eye,believe it or not it may help you. To improve that,play video games, but what I do is get one of those bouncy balls,and hit them towards the wall while aiming the catch it without looking. Another thing you could do is practise aiming your shoots. Try working out to increase muscle power in your arms,because often I find after a hard working rush,I'll barely have any strength for a decent shot.
     
  25. Jarick

    Jarick Doing Nothing

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    A lot of the guys joke about me being slow on the backcheck or not playing defense (some guys call me Hull aka Brett)...but I actually take pride in not being scored on and have a pretty high plus-minus at the end of the season. The key is to play your position and trust your teammates. Far more goals get scored when you "help out" the defense as a forward and go below the hash marks to chase the puck carrier.

    Really, there's not much you can work on at the low levels of hockey to become better defensively other than learning to read plays and positioning.
     

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