Baking skates?

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by Talent Analyst, Jan 6, 2011.

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  1. Talent Analyst

    Talent Analyst Registered User

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    I recently buy Easton SE10 skates and I'm not sure about baking them or not. At my local shop, they tell it's better for me to play with them and if I have problems (stiffness, etc.) after 5-10 games, then bake them.

    What is the pro, cons of baking skates? The guy told me it gave like 15 hours of deterioration.

    Thanks guys
     
  2. canuck44

    canuck44 Registered User

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    I've encountered some of these people that claim it's better to try to naturally break in skates instead of initially baking them. Personally, I think they're on crack.

    Pros:
    - Well, you can avoid a lot of potential pain.
    - With some of these thermoforming uppers on new skates, you'd practically never get them to form properly without baking

    Cons:
    - You do lose some lifespan of the skates, but a couple of times is negligible as far as I'm concerned.


    I've generally seen "bake at purchase, then bake after a few skates if there are any pressure points or discomfort" as the most common recommendation. I've personally never gone for a 2nd bake in any of my skates, although I'm considering doing so for my current pair.
     
  3. Jarick

    Jarick Doing Nothing

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    They should bake skates when you buy them. If you're having problems after a few skates, they should be punched or possibly re-baked.

    Pros - skates conform to your foot shape (slightly) and are more comfortable
    Cons - salesman has to get off his lazy ass and fire up the oven

    Personally I had my skates baked and sat in them for 15 minutes until they cooled down. Then I skated twice and had them punched out slightly as I had some arch pain. I skated a couple more times and it still hurt so I had them punched out wider and now they're perfect.
     
  4. Gino 14

    Gino 14 Registered User

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    Pros - By baking you remove some, hopefully all, of the pressure points that you would have from a generic fitting boot. Less discomfort from a more form-fiiting boot.

    Cons - Almost all boots are heat formable, there really is no down side.
     
  5. ponder

    ponder Registered User

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    Pretty much this, all skates should come with a free baking, that employee was just being lazy.
     
  6. ThisIsOilCountry

    ThisIsOilCountry Registered User

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    I got it done free of charge when I bought my skates at sportchek and I love it. I was able to adjust the skates much faster and I don't get some of the discomforts that come with new skates such as pains and cramps
     
  7. canuck44

    canuck44 Registered User

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    Some shops won't charge you at all for just baking your skates for you. As in you just walk into the shop with your skates and they'll toss them into the oven.
     

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