Off-Topic

For topics outside of hockey and sports.

Delaying the second COVID vaccine dose – a medical expert answers key questions vasilis asvestas/Shutterstock Paul Hunter, University of East Anglia The UK is facing an alarming escalation of the pandemic. Primarily, this seems to be due to a new, even more infectious variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. As of January 5, there are more patients in hospital in the UK than at the peak of the first wave in April 2020. Case numbers have started doubling about...
The Rink is a forum for the enjoyment and benefit of the "not ready for the spotlight" ice hockey players - recreational, non-competitive and derivative. The readers and mods will be happy to help with appropriate advice and suggestions about equipment, instructional situations, organizational questions, safety concerns or other topics that will make your experience at the rink better. To facilitate communicationsplease use appropriate wording and phrasing that does not activate or...
Let's say you are granted the choice to purchase any car/vehicle of your liking to drive. What's your pick? It could be a car you plan on driving as your daily vehicle or more of a collector/special occasion vehicle. Your call.
This game up in the GT thread last night and I want to explain why Canada is far ahead of the US in rolling this out. [URL="https://www.tsn.ca/tsn-4k-broadcast-schedule-1.900579"]TSN 4K Broadcast Schedule - TSN.ca[/URL] TV Schedule for Sportsnet 4K As you can see both of Canada's sports networks are doing more and more games and next month TSN will show The Masters in 4K produced by CBS and ESPN that won't be available in the US. The US broadcast networks seem to be following the same blueprint that they followed with HD some 15-20...
Coronavirus: A new type of vaccine using RNA could help defeat COVID-19 This scanning electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2 (round blue objects) emerging from the surface of cells cultured in the lab. NIAID-RML Sanjay Mishra, Vanderbilt University and Robert Carnahan, Vanderbilt University A century ago, on July 26, 1916, a viral disease swept through New York. Within 24 hours, new cases of polio increased by more than 68%. The outbreak killed more than 2,000 people in New...
Should we wear masks or not? An expert sorts through the confusion The guidance on masks appears to be shifting, but social distancing is still the key step people can take. Muhammad Fayyaz Rub/Shutterstock.com Thomas Perls, Boston University As a professor at Boston University’s School of Medicine and a geriatrician at Boston Medical Center caring for the most vulnerable in this pandemic, I’ve been asked a lot of questions about COVID-19. It turns out there is good science out...
How coronavirus threatens the seasonal farmworkers at the heart of the American food supply A farmworker picks lemons at an orchard in Mesa, California. Brent Stirton/Getty Images Michael Haedicke, Drake University Many Americans may find bare grocery store shelves the most worrying sign of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their food system. But, for the most part, shortages of shelf-stable items like pasta, canned beans and peanut butter are temporary because the U.S....
Coronavirus: are people with blood group A really at higher risk of catching COVID-19? angellodeco/Shutterstock Sakthivel Vaiyapuri, University of Reading A recent study from China, which has not been peer reviewed yet, suggests a link between having blood group A and a higher risk of getting COVID-19, compared with people who have blood group O. But is this really the case? As many of us know, there are different blood groups found in humans. Primarily, we differentiate...
Terrorists, militants and criminal gangs join the fight against the coronavirus Members of an arm of Hezbollah spray disinfectant in a Beirut neighborhood to fight the spread of the coronavirus. AP Photo/Bilal Hussein Jori Breslawski, University of Maryland The favelas of Rio de Janeiro are a toxic mix of tight quarters, few if any health services and little clean water for residents to wash their hands. In these conditions ripe for the spread of the coronavirus, the Brazilian...
The coronavirus genome is like a shipping label that lets epidemiologists track where it's been The steady rate of genetic changes lets researchers recreate how a virus has travelled. nextstrain.org, CC BY Bert Ely, University of South Carolina and Taylor Carter, University of South Carolina Following the coronavirus’s spread through the population – and anticipating its next move – is an important part of the public health response to the new disease, especially...
Coronavirus drifts through the air in microscopic droplets – here's the science of infectious aerosols From your lungs into the air around you, aerosols carry coronavirus. Peter Dazeley/The Image Bank via Getty Images Shelly Miller, University of Colorado Boulder During the 1970s when I was growing up in Southern California, the air was so polluted that I was regularly sent home from high school to “shelter in place.” There might not seem to be much in common...
What needs to go right to get a coronavirus vaccine in 12-18 months A coronavirus vaccine is coming, but when? Francesco Carta fotografo/Moment via Getty Images Marcos E. García-Ojeda, University of California, Merced I, like many Americans, miss the pre-pandemic world of hugging family and friends, going to work and having dinner at a restaurant. A protective vaccine for SARS-Cov2 is likely to be the most effective public health tool to get back to that world. Anthony Fauci,...
How do you stay safe now that states are reopening? An expert explains how to assess risk when reconnecting with friends and family People shop at the re-opening of the Farmer’s Market in Manhattan Beach, Calif. on May 12, 2020. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images Ryan Malosh, University of Michigan Editor’s note: Now that states are relaxing social distancing restrictions, people desperately want to see friends and family, go to a restaurant and let our kids have...
These dogs are trained to sniff out the coronavirus. Most have a 100% success rate Shutterstock Susan Hazel and Anne-Lise Chaber What does a pandemic smell like? If dogs could talk, they might be able to tell us. We’re part of an international research team, led by Dominique Grandjean at France’s National Veterinary School of Alfort, that has been training detector dogs to sniff out traces of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) since March. These detector dogs are trained...
SARS-CoV-2 infection can block pain, opening up unexpected new possibilities for research into pain relief medication The spike protein on SARS-CoV-2 interferes with pain perception. SEBASTIAN KAULITZKI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images Rajesh Khanna, University of Arizona Imagine being infected with a deadly virus that makes you impervious to pain. By the time you realize you are infected, it’s already too late. You have spread it far and wide. Recent findings in my lab...
Why an antidepressant could be used to treat COVID-19 Volodymyr TVERDOKHLIB/Shutterstock Colin Davidson, University of Central Lancashire A commonly used drug called fluvoxamine was recently tested as a treatment for COVID-19 in the United States. The 152 patients enrolled in the trial had been confirmed to have COVID-19 using a PCR test, and had seen symptoms appear within the past seven days. Patients who already required COVID-19 hospitalisation, or who had an...
US-backed vaccine patent waiver: pros and cons explained Farasat Bokhari, University of East Anglia The Biden administration has now agreed to back a proposal to suspend intellectual property protection for COVID vaccines. This is a break from US government’s long-held position on strong intellectual property protection, which has also been supported by many research-intensive countries in western Europe as well and the pharmaceutical industry. These protections are codified in the World...
The next pandemic is already happening – targeted disease surveillance can help prevent it Sustained surveillance for disease outbreaks at global hot spots may be the key to preventing the next pandemic. MR.Cole_Photographer/Getty Images Maureen Miller, Columbia University As more and more people around the world are getting vaccinated, one can almost hear the collective sigh of relief. But the next pandemic threat is likely already making its way through the population...
A mix-and-match approach to COVID-19 vaccines could provide logistical and immunological benefits One of this and one of that might be a good strategy to coronavirus vaccination. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images Maureen Ferran, Rochester Institute of Technology While it’s now pretty easy to get a COVID-19 shot in most places in the U.S., the vaccine rollout in other parts of the world has been slow or inconsistent due to shortages, uneven access and concerns about...
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