Taxes and the cap

Discussion in 'Montreal Canadiens' started by Schwang, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. Tighthead

    Tighthead Registered User

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    Those are entry costs. You specifically referred to annual fees. Which clubs are in line with your initial statement?

    As for write offs, this source suggests it’s not an option:

    Free Per Diem Calculator - Pilot Per Diem - Flight Attendant Per Diem - Airline Per Diem

    Also

    8 Types of Club Dues That Are Tax Deductible

    I assume you disagree with it?i

    Also would appreciate a cite on when the ACLU has involved itself in the membership of a private club. Doesn’t seem like their domain.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018
  2. Laurentide

    Laurentide Registered User

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    There have often been protests by groups like the ACLU whenever big USGA events have been held at clubs which are exclusionary. Augusta National is always a target which is why they eventually had to allow women to join. But that was only in 2012 and the first female they let in was Condi Rice.

    Controversy Over Women at Augusta Golf Course Leads to ACLU Federal Lawsuit on Protest Rights

    As for the fees, I may have conflated initiation fees, which frequently run into six figures (Trump National charges nearly $200K and is far from the most expensive) and yearly dues, which can run into the mid-to-high five figures. Once you add your bar tab to the dues, you're probably at or close to six figures if you're using the place at all.

    As for the tax write off, I'm going purely by what I heard that tax lawyer say. I'm sure that membership fees wouldn't be as high as they are unless there was a way to offset the cost through a tax loophole of some sort. Millionaire pro athletes employ people to find these loopholes. It's the same reason why seats in the club section at your local NHL arena are so ridiculously high. Because people aren't spending their own money. The tickets are bought at the corporate level and are written off as a business cost.
     
  3. Tighthead

    Tighthead Registered User

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    The ACLU wasn’t involved on membership. Per your cite it was about where the City of Augusta would allow the protests. Do you disagree? Why did you provide that as an example?

    Please provide an example where the ACLU has been involved with the membership decisions of a private golf course. You have twice stated it happens regularly. I can’t find a single instance.

    Can you find one source other than what you heard as to membership fees being written off? I provided two sources that say it isn’t permitted. There has to be more to what you are relying on other than “rich people find wrote offs.”
     
  4. Laurentide

    Laurentide Registered User

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    The ACLU represented a woman who was denied membership to a club in LA that she received as part of her divorce settlement:

    Court Curbs Clubs' Ability to Discriminate

    But this sort of thing is rare. The ACLU might protest against such discrimination but it knows that legally it can't do much because the private nature of the clubs allows them to circumvent existing anti-discrimination laws when admitting members. Their purpose is to bring these discriminatory practices to light so that the public at large will put pressure on them to change their ways. But again I never said that the ACLU was "regularly involved" in anything. Protesting and advocating against inequality and discrimination is what they do and since many country clubs are bastions of discrimination they will naturally come into conflict with them. Those clubs which want to stay out of the glare of the spotlight admit "tokens" to the ranks of their members in order to head off these protests.

    And no I have no sources regarding the tax exemptions other than what I heard the lawyer say. But I am sure that it would surprise no one if it was revealed that rich people get away with paying less than their fair share of taxes by finding loopholes they can exploit. Rich people buy the politicians who write in these loopholes for them.
     
  5. JianYang

    JianYang Registered User

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    It's a slippery slope. If you eqaulize the tax effect, which I presume is very complicated in itself, where do we draw the line?

    Do nothern climates get extra cap space for that weakness in attracting free agents too? What about equalizing the cost of living?

    It's not really a road to travel. The best bargaining chip for any team is to build a consistently competitive team, which getting increasingly harder to do, but it's the best equalizer that an organization can deploy.
     

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