Legacy of Hockey in Michigan

Discussion in 'The History of Hockey' started by andreydali19, Jun 27, 2006.

  1. andreydali19

    andreydali19 They're relentless

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    I'm taking nothing away from other U.S. states nor Canada in terms of hockey tradition, but I do feel it right to bring this up for consideration. I truly believe that, though it be my native state, the state of Michigan is truly worthy of being known as one of the most, and likely THE most, influential hockey state among the United States. One who lives here could see this in any of its sections; from Hockeytown to Traverse; from Grand Rapids to Sault St. Marie (MI). Its legacy is still budding in schools such as U-M & MSU; Mich. Tech & Ferris St.; Lake Superior & Grand Valley; among others. It was in the town of Houghton that a pair of teams would meet in 1903 and establish the most popular form of hockey today. For more about it, look here:

    http://www.cchockeyhistory.org/hockeyhistory.htm

    Throughout all of the years during which it has contributed, one would probably find it difficult to diminish Michigan's place in hockey history to less than any other place (outside of Canada).
     
  2. ClassicHockey

    ClassicHockey Registered User

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    Our research organization had one of their conferences in Houghton to coincide with then 100th anniversary of hockey in Houghton and the birth of the professional leagues. And Houghton is mentioned in the 'Hockey - A People's History' series. So, there is no lack of consideration given to that Michigan area.

     
  3. Pens75

    Pens75 Pens Fan Since 1975

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    I would have to agree, over the past 100 years, hard to beat.

    That is somewhat correct :) Along with the others you mentioned, Pittsburgh was actually the birthplace of professional hockey.

    The Duquesne Gardens -- built in the late 1800s in Oakland as a trolley barn, became the preeminent hockey building in America 100 years ago. Duquesne Gardens had something few others had in North America at the turn of the century -- grand artificial ice-making.

    According to Total Hockey, the official encyclopedia of the NHL, Pittsburgh was one of the first cities in North America to lure amateur Canadian players for what was a standard $30 a week stipend and a local job in the early 1900s. The attraction was the artificial ice at Duquesne Gardens. The manager of a Canadian team returned from a trip here in 1902, according to an account in Total Hockey, and gave the following description to the Toronto Globe:

    "Pittsburgh is hockey crazy. Over 10,000 turned out for our three games there. The general admission being 35 cents and 75 cents for a box seat . . . the Pittsburgh rink is a dream . . . What a marvellous place it is."

    It was that ice palace that helped make the city a pro hockey pioneer, much the way it had given birth to the first pro football players in the 1890s. There is strong suspicion that hockey players were paid here before 1904, but that is when the first pro league officially formed.

    Pittsburgh joined Sault Ste. Marie (Ontario), Sault Ste. Marie (Michigan), Calumet (Michigan) and Houghton (Michigan) to form the International Pro Hockey League in 1904. Other leagues popped up after that and the IPHL disbanded after the 1907 season. So, of the 26 current NHL teams, Pittsburgh was the first to field a pro hockey club, thanks to its artificial ice.

    "Lester Patrick, Penguins GM Craig Patrick's grandfather, started a league on the Pacific Coast early in the 20th century," Fischler said. "To learn how to get proper ice refrigeration, he came to Pittsburgh to see how it was done. It's ironic that the Canadians came to the states for that."


    It's funny that... Canadians came to Pittsburgh to play on better ice, and came to Pittsburgh to learn how to make the ice. You will never read that on NHL History at NHL.com. :)

    You can read the rest here if you like...

    http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=198796
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2006

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