Hockey Stick Question

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by championhabs, Oct 1, 2006.

  1. championhabs

    championhabs Registered User

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    Hi. I had a question about hockey sticks. This may be a dumb question but here it goes. What is the difference between a syngery(sp?) and a composite? Will one break easier? I can get my hands on a composite for $80 for a CCM Vector composite. Is this worth it? Or should i pay abit more $125 for an Easton Syngery. Thanks for all the help. Peace.
     
  2. JorgeRocks!

    JorgeRocks! Registered User

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    Same **** different pile. No big difference really. The Synergy should be lighter and better performing, but there won't be that big a difference.
     
  3. MikeD

    MikeD Registered User

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    the amount of flex is different, NO? The CCM is a bit stiffer.
     
  4. sc37

    sc37 Registered User

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    If I'm understadning your question...a Synergy is actually a composite. Both the sticks you have are made of composite materials..depending on the model fiberglass, carbon, kevlar. Just not wood. And your price depends on the model too. For the durability, CCM might be a little better, since there are different models of Synergies. There's a ST--super tough, or SL-- super light which isn't the most durable. CCM are known to be pretty durable, but performance and feel might be lacking just a tad bit behind the Easton Synergy. It's really personal preference, or in some cases $. Hope that answers your question.
     
  5. Joey13

    Joey13 Registered User

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    As stated above, a Synergy is a composite. All composites are made of some non-wood materials. The difference is really the weight. The top of the line composites are extremely light and that is their attraction.

    You can buy a "composite" but it may be still be heavy. A stealth is around 400 grams and is the lightest - I believe. I am a huge composite fan (I prefer TPS and Easton) but don't see the point of spending $80 for a composite that weighs the same as a wooden stick.

    Hops that makes sense?
     
  6. xeric716x

    xeric716x Born To Expire

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    the CCM will up better.
     
  7. Gino 14

    Gino 14 Registered User

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    you should be looking more at how the stick feels and if it has the right curve for you. If the curve isn't right it doesn't matter which stick costs what. If you really don't know that much about sticks, why not stick with wooden ones till you know what you want in a curve and fit? you can usually buy a few wooden sticks for the price of a good composite and not be out as much if the stick isn't right for you.
     
  8. stick9

    stick9 Registered User

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    For your first composite stick the $80 Vector isn't a bad choice. If you want something a little better, look at Bauer Vapor XXX or the Vapor XX. Both can be had for under $100.
     
  9. santiclaws

    santiclaws Registered User

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    I'd start with a composite shaft/blade combo. That way you can easily experiment with different curves and find one that you like best. Then you can shell out for a one piece if you feel like it. In all honesty, I think that for players who are novices to intermediates, composite sticks offer little to no benefit, other than in their heads.

    Which of course doesn't stop me from owning three of 'em. :D
     

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