Finger ache from stick?

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by Phoenix, May 22, 2006.

  1. Phoenix

    Phoenix Registered User

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    When you ppl started playing, did you ever get sore joints/fingers from holding the stick? I've just started playing, and at first before I started practising for about 1/2 hour off ice my fingers were fine, but since I started practising some simple puck handling off-ice, I've found my fingers almost arthritic-like sore(at least I imagine - never had arthritis, I'm too young!). Thought I'd need to just adjust, maybe holding it too hard, but I woke up last night and they were really stiff.
     
  2. night-timer

    night-timer Registered User

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    Sometimes, but not always, I got a jarring sensation in the bones of my wrist and hand when I shoot slapshots. I wouldn't describe it as 'arthritic like', however. It may just occur on those occasions when I hit the ice a little too far behind the puck.

    I figure, hit a couple of inches behind it, but not 6 to 8 inches.
     
  3. stick9

    stick9 Registered User

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    My hands hurt from time to time. Some times really bad, other times not at all.

    Try practicing with your gloves on. They may absorb some of the shock.

    I am just assuming here so take it for what it's worth, I'm no doctor. There isn't all that much muscle in your hands. It's mostly tendons and ligiments. When those hurt it feels like your bones are aching. Chances are they are sore from what you doing because it's not something you have done a lot of before.
     
  4. Phoenix

    Phoenix Registered User

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    I do practise wearing my goves, but I wonder because I'm more puck-handling/control rather than shooting that is why I'm gripping my stick really tight. But mum's also got arthritis so I'm worried a little that I might be doing something wrong now that could damage me later!
     
  5. Phoenix

    Phoenix Registered User

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    Perhaps it is my tendons. The soreness isn't as much now, although I have been resting them this week a bit. But we're just going into winter now and I find when I wake up in the morning, my fingers are sooo icy stiff, and only my right hand (considering I'm right-handed). Never had this happen before in my life.
     
  6. #66

    #66 Registered User

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    I actually think that its nothing more than sore muscles in your hand and will go away in time. It sounds like your using the right technique to grip your stick, gripping it more with your fingers than your palms, and for a puck control guy building up hand strength is ultra important.
     
  7. Spetzky

    Spetzky Registered User

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    When I get that it's usually my bones being jarred or my fingers arre peeling away from the nail.
     
  8. Geogaddi

    Geogaddi Registered User

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    Soft Hands...Soft Hands...
     
  9. Headcoach

    Headcoach Registered User

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    How old are you? Different foods can cause Inflammation of the joints, plus a bad diet. Example: A lot of pain in the joints would be a sign of Gout. Gout are little microscopic crystals that from between joints.

    Gout is a systemic disease (i.e., condition that occurs throughout the body) caused by the buildup of uric acid in the joints. An elevated blood level of uric acid (called hyperuricemia) occurs when the liver produces more uric acid than the body can excrete in the urine, or when a diet high in rich foods (e.g., red meat, cream sauces, red wine, Asparagus some cheeses.) produces more uric acid than the kidneys can filter from the blood.

    In fact, regularly drinking alcohol interferes with the removal of uric acid from the body and can increase the risk for developing gout.

    Over time, uric acid in the blood crystallizes and settles in the joint spaces, causing swelling, inflammation, stiffness, and pain. Gout usually affects the first metatarsal phalangeal joint of the big toe (hallux) or the ankle joints. However, I have seen it form in just about any joint.

    Head coach
     
  10. Phoenix

    Phoenix Registered User

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    Diet? Uh, well dunno. I'm 23, and I eat fairly healthily, every now and then I go on a chocolate phase, or macadamia/cashew phase, but that's about it. Love meat, but don't eat it excessively.

    I find whenever I practise at home - which is mainly puckhandling (thanks to whoever posted the website for those off-ice drills! They've been a big help!), I wake up the next day with stiff figures and I have to flex them and really warm them up. But they do 'ache' at bit. But after training I don't have a problem, but I guess we focus on more than just puckhandling. I think I also probably have a lazy left arm. :sarcasm:

    BTW, going off-topic, what's the best way to make high shots. I've been trying to find somewhere that explains it but best I know is that you have to somehow rotate your wrists. Is this before, on hitting the puck, or after?! I'm a real novice here and I just can't seem to consistently lift the puck off the ice.
     
  11. Headcoach

    Headcoach Registered User

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    Well, when I started, I had the same problem. And maybe the finger ache think is due to never having to work those muscles every hard. But for me, now after doing this for over 35 years, hell, i'm just waiting for the arthritis to kick in.

    Anyways, about you shooting. Generally the follow through with you stick is going to determine the height of the puck. For instance, The Sweep Pass is the basic foundation for all upper body movements that will help you perform everything from passing to shooting.

    It starts off by placing the puck six to eight inches behind the near skate. Applying pressure to the shaft with the lower hand for leverage and using the top hand for power or force. What?

    Sure, lets look at basic physics....
    (Please excuses the crudity of the drawings)

    In this drawing, you will see that I have my hockey stick under a box. When I'm on the ice, I place the blade under a players skate.
    [IMAGE]http://www.passthepuck.net/forumimages/f9386b30.png[/IMAGE]
    You will see that I am trying to lift the box up with my stick and wrist. You can also see, that at this point, the force is all on my wrist and that it is impossible for me to lift the box with the force at my wrist.

    Odds are really good that my wrist will not handle the force and it will break. However, if you look at this next picture, you will see that I have placed a "Fulcrum" halfway down the shaft.
    [IMAGE]http://www.passthepuck.net/forumimages/f9566b60.png[/IMAGE]
    By placing the fulcrum down the shaft, the force is now applied at the fulcrum point. Thus, I can apply pressure to the top of the shaft and the box will move up.

    The rule also apply to Passing or Shooting! The speed of the puck is directly proportional to the "Fulcrum Point" leverage (Bottom Hand) and the force or pressure applied with the top hand.

    A good example is a row boat. The point at which the oar attaches to the side of the boat is the Fulcrum

    So, when you pass or shoot, make sure that the top arms go to full extension. Once there, pull back towards your body and leave the bottom hand still.

    Now the reason why I'm go through all this is. Young players have a tendency to push the puck with there bottom hand and keep the top hand still. Those shots are weak and slow.

    Now, when you shoot, the follow through with your stick is going to determine the height of the puck. If you follow through high, the puck goes high. If you follow through low, the puck goes low. Now, where ever you point your stick (Blade) in the follow through is where the puck is going to go.

    I have more tips on my forum as well. However, I would be more than happy to give you tips here. Hope this helps in some way.

    Head coach
    www.passthepuck.net
     
  12. Phoenix

    Phoenix Registered User

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    Thanks, that was a good tip. I am though still a bit confused with actually lifting the puck off the ice! I get it occasionally, but when I do I can never figure out what I did right. I get the height bit, but in the follow-through should my right (shaft hand/I'm right handed) palm be facing up the higher I want the puck to lift?

    Cos if I go from palm up in the initial preparation to a palm down in the follow through, wouldn't that prevent the puck from lifting off the ice? I'm led to believe though that this is the best way for all shots.
    And when I hit the puck, should I flick my wrists then? Or should my bladejust hit it straight on?

    Hope I'm not being too technical with words here but I've got absolutely no one to ask at the moment, let alone demonstrate. My work roster has made it even harder for me to make trainings. Grrrrr.
     
  13. Alpine

    Alpine Registered User

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    Which hand mostly, the lower hand or the upper hand? The power, strength is in the upper and the snap accuracy from the lower but more in the wrist really? You might be gripping too hard on the lower thinking that should be your power hand? Just a thought.....
     
  14. Headcoach

    Headcoach Registered User

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    Well, I have found that if you kind of cup the puck a little with the blade of your stick, and then picture the stick blade moving under the puck to flip up, that seem to help. Good for flip shots.

    As for actual shooting, I do the same thing, but have the puck cupped toward the middle of the blade. As I start to shoot, I kind of pull the stick towards me allowing the puck to move out towards the tip of the blade.

    As this happens the puck starts to move up the blade, a little off the ice, towards the end of the blade. Then it's just a matter of pushing and aiming your shot with the follow through and the tip of the blade.

    Head coach
    www.passthepuck.net
     
  15. Phoenix

    Phoenix Registered User

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    My lower hand is the one hurting. I think it is a combination of gripping too hard with this hand, but my left (upper) arm is lazy. I've been told before to hold my elbow up. Also, I tried out that power tip, using my upper hand for strength last night, and whilst I didn't practise for long, this morning there wasn't the stiffness I was half-expecting. Hopefully that'll do the trick!
     
  16. Alpine

    Alpine Registered User

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    Have you tried a left hand shot? Most left hand shooters aren't left handed. Why do you think most Canadians play golf from the left........"Because I shoot from the left in hockey" ......try using your natural strong side at the top of the stick.
    Not to sound like I know what I'm talking about, just try some different things.
     
  17. Headcoach

    Headcoach Registered User

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    I total agree! Check out this threat that I wrote in. Some agreed, other did not.
    http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?p=5047387#post5047387

    Head coach
     
  18. Phoenix

    Phoenix Registered User

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    Well, on the bright side, I've been really excited cos I've had much more success lifting the puck! :) Thanks for the advice all! Practice should hopefully see me get it higher and more accurate.
    On the bad side, my knuckles hurt this morning! Its winter for me at the moment so I don't know whether I should be concerned or not. I might have to restrict the type of practice I do.

    Actually, on second thought, would practising in a confined space have anything to do with me perhaps gripping harder on the stick do yas think? I'm forced to practise in a VERY Small space in my house about 4mx1.5m. Not ideal, but there's no suitable space in my yard and with work, finding a place elsewhere is hard.
     

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