Draft Question

Discussion in 'The Business of Hockey' started by Choice, May 30, 2006.

  1. Choice

    Choice Registered User

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    Why is hockey the only sport in which a player can still play ncaa after having entered the draft and being drafted?
     
  2. Jonjmc

    Jonjmc Registered User

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    Baseball is the same way. A kid can be drafted after his senior year in High School, not sign the pro contract, and go play college baseball..... only to be drafted again.
     
  3. Choice

    Choice Registered User

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    Yeah he can be drafted, choose not to sign and re enter another year. The team that originally drafted him out of high school doesn't hold on to his rights. In the NHL, they do.
     
  4. TheMoose

    TheMoose Registered User

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    They have to sign the player within 2 years of 1st drafting the player, otherwise he goes back into the draft, if i'm not mistaken.
     
  5. Choice

    Choice Registered User

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    I think it's two or three. Either way, hockey is the only sport that seems to work like this.

    If I get drafted by the Tigers and choose to go to UTexas rather than play pro, they don't hold my rights.

    If I get drafted by the Red Wings and decide to go to Michigan instead of juniors, I'm still Detroit property for at least 2 years.
     
  6. Skk82

    Skk82 Registered User

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    that's the rule for canadian juniors...teams have the august of a player's graduation year to sign the NCAA, or lose their rights.

    the plain answer is that the act of drafting a player by no means voids their eligibility, as defined by the NCAA. in basketball and football the 'student'-athletes are already fully prepared for the next league and have signed with agents, voiding their NCAA eligibility.

    in hockey, players are drafted early in their college career and often times do not sign contracts to receive compensation from their teams.

    similiarly, if a collegiate player attends an NHL rookie camp, there are very strict rules on how much money the team (which usualy grants some form of compensation, as well as a meals stipend) can receive. NHL teams know the NCAA's rules and do not violate them, ensuring the player's eligibility remains in tact.

    in theory, the NFL could draft players after their freshman year of college is complete but then not allow teams to sign players until the player's junior year is finished. under that scenario, teams would hold the rights of players for two years without receiving compensation and staying in school. obviously, neither football or basketball has these rules.

    baseball's rule, i believe, is that a team can only hold a player's rights for a year, at which point they will be eligible to be re-drafted. obviously, if the student signs a pro contract, his remaining year(s) of college eligibility are forfeited.

    it's just the difference in rule. hockey could change their rules, but chose not to.

    just the differences in development between the various sports and how the rules of drafting (and minor league systems) have evolved.
     
  7. Hasbro

    Hasbro Can He Skate?! Sponsor

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    Because the NCAA is a thoroughly backwards organizaation that regularly makes arbitratrary rules contrary to common sense.
     
  8. Skk82

    Skk82 Registered User

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    while not untrue, it's not the NCAA's responsibility for the differences in rules betwen the MLB, NFL, NBA and NHL.

    baseball says a team has one year after drafting to sign a player or that player is thrown back into the pool for re-draft. but baseball has a significantly bigger player pool and longer draft (aren't there upwards of 50+ rounds?).

    hockey's rule, per the new CBA, is NHL teams own rights of players they draft for longer than a year. this encourages teams to draft NCAA players and give them development time.

    in the NFL, most draftees are 3 or 4 years older than hockey or baseball players and more physically developed for their sport. i believe NFL teams only retain a drafted player's rights for a year, but almost all draftees have signed contracts with agents, automatically forgoeing their NCAA eligibility.
     
  9. Hasbro

    Hasbro Can He Skate?! Sponsor

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    Specificaly we are talking about hockey players being able to opt in for the draft and not lose their eligibility. Drafting players outside of their own volition has gone on forever. And even the NBA has had the situation (most notably with Larry Bird).

    It's probably a better policy and I believe there are reentry excemption rules for the NBA draft as well.

    But then again this organizationdidn't let Mike Williams back into USC after he declared early thinking Sophmores would be eligible.
     
  10. Choice

    Choice Registered User

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    I just thought of this because i was watching an NCAA hockey game this year, and many of the guys I was like "oh he belongs to the Coyotes, and he belongs to the Senators." It would be kind of cool to be able to watch a college football game knowing who had the rights to each player.

    I guess another reason for this is that college hockey only amounts to a fraction of NHL draftees. Same for baseball, although a bigger fraction. Basketball the majority and football 99.9%
     
  11. Skk82

    Skk82 Registered User

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    the difference is that mike williams had signed with an agent. just as soon a collegiate athlete signs with a professional agent his college eligibility is forever forfeited.

    a scenario where williams could have likelt have retained his NCAA eligibility would have been: to simply have declared his intention to enter the NFL draft and, after the court struck down maurice clarett's case. just like how many basketball players will declare for the draft (to send out feelers on where they'd likely get picked) but not sign with an agent so if their stock is too low they're safe to come back to school. however, the instant a student-athlete receives some sort of unfair benefits or compensation (agents, pro contracts, endorsement deals, etc) his NCAA eligibility is forfeited.

    of course, one could argue it's dumb if the endorsements came from skiing and that doesn't directly effect a football career (the jeremy bloom situation) or how hypocritical that institutions make big bucks off of nike and adidas while the featured athletes only get the cost of tuition in return. but that's a whole different can of worms.


    the simple answer to the question, again, is:
    collegiate athletes are allowed to keep playing in following years upon being drafted to the NHL as long as they receive no unfair compensation that would compromise their eligibility.
    the simple act of being drafted by a professional league doesn't change anything, in that regards. however, signing a 6 figure deal with gatorade, or signing with an agent and getting hooked up with an escalade obviously does.


    NHL teams are allowed to retain the rights of collegiate players years after they've been drafted because that's what they and the NHLPA agreed to in the CBA. same reason why NHL teams use to hold the rights to european players for years and years and years (in the last CBA) after they'd been drafted. that's just the NHL's rule.

    why don't other sports leagues see players get drafted and still play in college (under the initial team's rights) for years?
    answer: either their rules dictate that a player's rights are only held for a year (football, baseball) or most of the players with NCAA eligibility remaining have willingly forfeited it by signing an agent, or intending to be drafted and signing a pro contract.


    do you understand what i'm trying to convey?
     

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