bad for butterfly?

Discussion in 'The Rink' started by Goalie_Gal, Sep 23, 2006.

  1. Goalie_Gal

    Goalie_Gal Registered User

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    I just got a new pair of goal pads (well, used, but new to me), they are Brown "Illusion" pads. As the guy was ringing them up I commented that they seemed like they were in really good shape and he said he gets a lot of Browns because people don't like them. When I asked why, he said they're bad for butterfly. That people buy them thinking they'll be good butterfly pads but they're not. I felt like an idiot so I didn't ask why, but now I'm wondering. I have only been playing for 6 months but I play 3-4 times a week and I am pretty pleased with the progess I've made in that short time in terms of skill, but I wonder if anyone knows what this guy is talking about, and if it will make much of a difference for me anyway at this level. I definitely would consider myself a butterfly goalie. It was never a conscious decision to have that style but that's how it developed.

    Thanks in advance for any answers.
     
  2. Frank Drebin

    Frank Drebin Habs

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    Probably what he meant was most of the pads now are designed to have the front of the pads face forwards instead of down on the ice when you go down into the butterfly.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much, if you are comfortable wearing the pads that is the most important thing...I started playing goal with a pad that wasn't necessarily a butterfly pad, but it performed fine, especially for my skill level at the time.

    Don't worry what the salesguy said, if you find the pads are not doing the proper job or are becoming uncomfortable, then it's time to switch.

    Good luck and keep at it!
     
  3. MikeD

    MikeD Registered User

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    Many Browns have a traditional build to them. Deep leg and skate channel, minimal or non existant landing gear. I havent seen the illusion model first hand so cant give you specifics. Many goalies today want a pat that rotates as if on its own, balance stabilizers to hold them up etc etc. In other words it takes very little skill to get a max benefit of the pad designed for b-fly usage today.

    your going to prob have to fiddle with your strap settings and such to get the rotation you want out of them.
    A good snug attachement at the skate/heel straps and loose up the calf and knee will be close to what you will find works to give you decent rotation. The end result is you will be a more skilled goalie than those who just strap on one of todays current cheater pads that are designed more for undue aid in defending the net than simply protection of the goalie as a primary function.
     
  4. Goalie_Gal

    Goalie_Gal Registered User

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    Awesome. Anything that makes me a better goalie is fine with me! Thanks guys.
     
  5. Bulldog fan

    Bulldog fan Timmy Dogs Alum 1999

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    Well said, tight at the ankle and loose all the way up the leg is the best way to strap on your pads to make the pads work for you, in terms of forming a proper butterfly anyway.
     
  6. MikeD

    MikeD Registered User

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    another thing I forgot to mention. The brown pads are probably a tad heavier. If your finding trouble getting FULL rotation, it may take a real serious snappping of the knees inward as you open at the hips when you drop into your fly. My heaton 6 6800's are much this way. With the deep channels and heavier pads I need to have good knee bend, stance width slightly more than shoulder width and a hard snap bringing the knees together. The nice part about the whole thing is on recovery. The pads will come back front pretty well as long as the straps for skate integration are not TOO tight. When skating, if you have a feel of being pulled to one side or another it could be a skate/heel strap a tad bit too tight.

    If you have toe straps instead of laces you might want to consider purchasing a bridge and lace set up. If there are no toe caps(open toe like a floor hockey pad) and straps, maltesehockey sells a very inexpensive gel toe cap w/lace replacement that you get custom to your pads. I had these installed on my heatons after taking a shot to the cap that hurt like hell and then had my foot go numb from the impact. I also had the straps which got cut every time a puck struck the front of the blade. The knot set up for laces is pretty important. Pulling the lace/bridge tight to the skate blade can cause some problems. When going wide for your B-fly drop the pad can lift the blade free from the ice instead of cowling contact. Reduced angle of blade contact means less extention for lateral drives from a down position and a higher knee lift to regain edge. It can also seriously increase the risk of a slip out/groin injury.

    The lace should allow the pad to slide over in its skate channel so that the cowling is what contacts the ice, lifting the blade free. The pics below will show the set up I have found to work best.

    This is what you want the pad to do, slide over....
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    a square knot tied tight to the bridge and a simple knot about 1-1.5 inches out from there.

    it is real important that the second simple knot is centered on the front of the skate blade and that the laces are crossed going through the first opening in the skate blade chassi. After that how far back you co criss crossing and then up around the skate is totally a personal preference. A standard skate lace works best for durability.

    One problem many have is the toe lace knot coming undone. I suggest that the goalie place his skates on but do not tighten them. secure the toe lace from the pad to the skates and then take the ends and bows under the loose skate laces. Lay flat and then tighten the skates to the feet. This way they are held in place between the skate tongue and the skate laces. They do not come looose or otherwise drop down to get stepped on.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2006
  7. Goalie_Gal

    Goalie_Gal Registered User

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    Yes, I just got the hang of this actually, on the advice from the guy who helped me in the store. I had them strapped really tight- I didn't know any different- and he told me about that. I have been doing it that way for the last few games I've played and it makes such a difference!
     
  8. Goalie_Gal

    Goalie_Gal Registered User

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    MikeD, thanks for all that info. It's going to take me a bit to digest it, because some of it is a little over my head. I don't play ice (yet!), I've been playing inline. I got those pads over the Missions they showed me that are intended for roller because I want to go to ice at some point. (And also the Missions were brand new and a bit out of my price range).

    I've also kind of been flying by the seat of my pants- no coach or anything, just learning by doing (and by reading websites, magazines and books, and watching other goalies). Thanks for the pictures, that really helps too.
     

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