4 Step Fast Fix for the NHL

Discussion in 'The Business of Hockey' started by Hockee, Feb 28, 2005.

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  1. Hockee

    Hockee Registered User

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    It's pretty much unanimous, we all want firewagon hockey brought back. And frankly, that's the only thing that will save the NHL, CBA or no. But how do you get firewagon hockey back? Simple.

    1. Bring back the tag up offsides rule.
    2. Eliminate the 2 line pass whistle.
    3. Contract 9 teams.
    4. Limit the size of goalie pads and ENFORCE the new rules.

    The first two put "flow" back into the game.
    #3 eliminates the pluggers from NHL rosters. There's no reason why we should ever see Jamie Allison, Dan Hinote or Jason Williams in an NHL game.
    #4 counteracts the heightened abilities of today's goaltenders. Goaltending has gotten better since the 80's, but not THAT much. A lot of it can be attributed to larger pads.

    4 steps. Firewagon hockey. Bring it on!
     
  2. Injektilo

    Injektilo Registered User

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    the only way you can really bring it back is if you eliminate goalies who can do the butterfly (or make it illegal) and remove any coaches who actually have training in the game. bring in people who only have an hour or two each day to devote to being a coach.

    the players are well coached and well organized, they know how to play systems and they know exactly waht to do in each situation.
    the goalies have gotten incredibly better than they were even 15 years ago, that's why scoring is down, it's not the size of the pads.


    those aren't gonna happen, so don't expect it to ever really come back to that era.
     
  3. Hockee

    Hockee Registered User

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    You are wrong.

    Players are better trained physically, but not mentally. There is no difference there.

    The butterfly was around in the days of Gretzky and Kurri. They scored anyway.

    Pads and equipment have had a huge effect. This is not debatable.

    You're going to have to come back with a little more than you came with here, because frankly you are just talking out of your tailpipe.
     
  4. andora

    andora Registered User

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    i agree on the contraction... maybe a few less though, 6 teams perhaps
     
  5. Poignant Discussion*

    Poignant Discussion* I tell it like it is

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    Yup 24 is the perfect amount of teams. 4 Divisions, 6 teams. Top 4 teams in each division in playoffs
     
  6. kruezer

    kruezer Registered User

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    Yeah, and divisional playoffs, re-invent some rivalries.
     
  7. Stand-up was the preferred style of goaltending up until the early 90s. A lot of the goals scored in the Gretzky-Kurri era would have most current fans calling for their team's goaltender's head. The butterfly style was pioneered by Patrick Roy, and he was a rookie in 1986.

    Like it or not, goaltenders are much better coached today than they were 20 years ago.
     
  8. Injektilo

    Injektilo Registered User

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    Oh c'mon. There is a massive difference between goalies of 20 years ago and goalies of today. Teams didn't even have goalie coaches back then. When was the last time you watched a game from the 80's and studied the goalies? There's a massive difference between positioning in net, which is by far the most important aspect of goaltending today. As for pad size, Broduer and Hasek have been the two best goalies of the last decade, and they wear less padding than almost all other goalies. It matters, but not nearly enough as positioning and technique do. Go watch a game from the 80's and tell me the goalies were just as good back then. I'd take any backup from today's goalies over any star goalie from before the early 90's.


    And players are much much better coached today. I remember a Don Cherry quote from when he used to coach the bruins, and he described teaching a new player all the teams plays on napkin over lunch.
    Coaching is all about systems and analysis and videotape, and it's far more pervasive than it was 20 years ago.



    Jesus, just watch a frickin game from the 80's and tell me it's the exact same thing...
     
  9. Habsfan 32

    Habsfan 32 Registered User

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    Yup. We need more rivalries.
     
  10. Zednik

    Zednik Registered User

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    How about bigger nets ? I would add 6 inches on the left, 6 inches on the right. We would see more goals, and more exciting games IMO.
     
  11. Tb0ne

    Tb0ne Registered User

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    I suggested the same idea before, but someone made a very good point.

    Hockey nets are quite expensive, so changing them around the world would be a very expensive procedure. So much so, that it probably would not be considered.

    On the other hand, if it was a cheap thing to do I think it would be one of the better options as it would force goalies to be more acrobatic.. and so.. more exciting.
     
  12. Gee Wally

    Gee Wally Grumpy

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    I'm all for :

    Calling what's on the books.
    Very unbalanced schedule .
    Make the lines bigger like the AHL.
    Reduce roster size.
    Reduce size of goalie equipment.
    Outlaw composite sticks.
    Get rid of the instigator rule.
    No intentional icing when short handed.
     
  13. X0ssbar

    X0ssbar Guest

    Agree. The NHL wants more scoring - widen the nets and the ice, period.
     
  14. Munchausen

    Munchausen Guest

    This would be a terrible mistake. Watch some European hockey. The no red line rule only encourages teams to play more defensively. You think this will open up the game? Not in the least. It will just have the coaches have their Dmen stay deeper, more trapping, less pinching... I never want to see the no red line rule in the NHL.

    No way this ever happens under Bettman. 1-2, if they struggle in the post-CBA era, maybe. 9? Never going to happen.
     
  15. Munchausen

    Munchausen Guest

    The problem with the league isn't the goals scored. It's the scoring chances. The reason why the game has become so boring is because the scoring chances have been dramatically reduced over the last decade. I've seen some excellent 1-0 / 2-1 games in the past and likewise, I've sen some 4-3 snooze fests.

    The game isn't all about putting it in (if it was, we'd be better off just having a 60 min. shootout competition), it's about how you get there. The excitement comes from the speed, turnovers and offensive plays. That's what needs to be worked on.

    I couldn't care less there's no more 200 pts scorers. What I do care about is the boring puck dumping, never-ending cycling that never amount to anything, as well as the clutching and grabbing, especially in the neutral zone, that takes away all the speed.

    Give back the game to the skilled players!
     
  16. futurcorerock

    futurcorerock Registered User

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    Did i really just read that people want to outlaw the Butterfly?

    All the maneuver does is make goalies efficient on the 2nd, 3rd shots. This maneuver is also great for the NHL we see today where guys like Rick Nash who utilize the technique of camping in front of the net and finding the puck on his stick and the goalie with a hole.

    There are plenty of ways to beat a butterfly goaltender. Kinda forgot one thing about the Butterfly: Immobility across the crease.

    Namely, putting him out of position with dekes and trick maneuvers.

    I think if they limit the pads a little bit, the Butterfly will be a non-issue, still, it's a vital part of the game.
     
  17. Double-Shift Lasse

    Double-Shift Lasse Just post better

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    I've never been in favor of increasing the dimensions of the goal, but in favor of shrinking the goalie pads. However, this discussion has me thinking. A larger goal would require goalies, who now almost exclusively employ the butterfly, to play a more acrobatic style, either in place of, or more likely, in conjunction with, the 'fly. So while larger goals might increase goal-scoring, it could also possibly increase highlight saves, and there are few things in sports more exciting/impressive.

    Count me also among those who believe the ice surface needs to be bigger. And also among those who believe it'll never happen.
     
  18. X0ssbar

    X0ssbar Guest

    Agreed. To me that is what widening the ice would solve. The skill players need to space to move more than anything else IMO. We can talk about bigger blue lines, crackdowns on obstruction and tag up off sides rules til we are blue in the face but to me these are minor changes that wouldn't see any real significant improvements to the on ice product. Yeah a combination of these things should increase goal scoring but would it be anything to make the average sports fan take notice - I doubt it.

    Me personally - I don't mind the game way it is played today but I'm like most of you here - a die hard who will watch the game regardles. The NHL isn't after the die-hards, they already have us, they want more casual hockey fans to become die hards and they know scoring and skill presentation sell. So if the NHL really wants to overhaul the game to allow for more scoring and for the skill players to display their skills - I believe widening the ice and nets will be two major steps towards making that happen above anything else.

    Of course the major stumbling block to both of these steps is cost. Costs to replace the nets, costs to widen the ice and costs to remove seats.

    Of course the problem with the NHL is that they want significant on ice improvements in goal scoring and skill presentation but I don't think they are willing to trade the costs of implementing solutions that could really work to increase these areas of the on-ice product to get the desired result. Instead they will add thicker blue lines and try to enforce the infamuous "crackdown on obstruction".
     
  19. Hockee

    Hockee Registered User

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    I picked 9 because it would put the NHL back at 21 teams. Remember the glory years of the NHL? 21 teams.

    Those added 3 teams are 75 more players. Personally, I would like to see 21 teams like it was before, but whatever. Maybe 20 teams would be better even. 4 divisions of five teams, 4 teams in each division make the playoffs...divisional playoffs.

    Imagine how heated Wings-Hawks would get again. Or Avs-Canucks. Not to mention that the Boston, Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa division would be INSANE.

    Another great thing that reducing it to 20 teams would do is that it would make the AHL a viable league, something that the fans would want to go see. Players would develop there and play NHL style, not the pluggers that the AHL is filled with now. That would be 10 teams worth of NHL players that would be in the AHL.
     
  20. Dave is a killer

    Dave is a killer Dave's a Mess

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    what? ... you don't like dump and retrieve while short handed? what else is the shorthanded team to do? ... they have to skate the puck past the center line or into the opponents' zone while shorthanded? ... help me out

    Move the End Lines back to where they were previously (10 feet from the end boards) ... more attack room can only help and part b of moving the end lines back is automatic icing ... go watch the don cherry video of where he shows all the major injuries while a dman was coming back to touch the puck up for icing ... INSANITY
     
  21. Gee Wally

    Gee Wally Grumpy

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    nope I don't like it. If a team is penalized that it really hurt. Also it would require more skill to move the puck out . They would have to clear the redline. Short handed or not.

    More skill is what I'm hoping for all around with my suggestions.
     
  22. Mighty Duck

    Mighty Duck Registered User

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    The real problem has been, and still is the Top 10% paid players in the game today. No effort, big paycheck, only thing in your proposal is having more big time floaters on one team, bigger payroll.
     
  23. Dave is a killer

    Dave is a killer Dave's a Mess

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    why can't the league just "flush" the floaters? :D ... those are the kind of players I loathe as well
     
  24. grego

    grego Registered User

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    It is mostly the style of hockey teams play that has caused it so many "inferior" players are in the league today. Players that would never get to play in an offensive league, but thrive in a clutch and grab league. I blame the lack of enforcement of rules for the apparently diluted talent.

    After all until the early 90s there were few if any players in the NHL from eastern Europe ( USSR, Czech Republic, Germany ). And yet we feel players were superior without these great stars in our game during that day. The influx of stars from those countries gives the NHL the ability to have expanded another 8 teams with less trouble to the game for talent then you would find in MLB, NFL or NBA. Since MLB is mostly North, Central and Southern America for talent. And NFL and NBA are almost exclusively US only talent in the league.

    This gives the NHL more possible talent to choose from to fill the 700 positions in the league. Somethat that could be easily done.
     
  25. wazee

    wazee Registered User

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    Along with the mix of ideas thrown out here already, I will toss out one more.

    Eliminate trapping systems.

    Each time this is suggested, people say it would be impossible to enforce. My three part solution…

    1. Define it. Sure, everybody knows a trap when they see it, but a reasonable definition of what is and is not legal needs to be written down.

    2. Hire a few old coaches to watch tape of the games the day after the game is played to look for violations.

    3. Then, fine any team found using the trap. Set it up so the fines are meaningful and increase heavily each time a team is fined. The decision to trap is a management decision, and management should pay for using it.

    In addition, I am in favor of most things that will open up the game.

    - Smaller, heavier goalie pads.
    - Larger nets or smaller posts.
    - Enforcement of the rules on hooking and holding.
    - Calling the game the same from the beginning to the end.
    - Serving the full 2 minutes of a penalty.
    - Shorter sticks.
    - etc.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2005
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